The Confederacy

There is lots of debate these days about the short lived Confederate States of America…..to some it is “heritage” (for me that is just a cover term) to others it was a repressive state dedicated to the ideal of white supremacy.

Let the old Professor take you on a trip down that historical lane…..

We can pretend that the cause of the war were several factors but the truth of the matter is…..Confederates fought the war mainly to protect a southern society of which slavery was an integral part.

For any of my history buffs….if you would like to see how the CSA was set up then here is a copy of the Constitution…..https://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/csa_csa.asp

Here is the sanitized version of the CSA from the History Net….

The Confederacy, when used within or in reference to North America, generally means the Confederate States of America. It is also called the Southern Confederacy and refers to 11 states that renounced their existing agreement with others of the United States in 1860–1861 and attempted to establish a new nation in which the authority of the central government would be strictly limited and the institution of slavery would be protected. Secession from the existing Union led to the American Civil War, a bloody, four-year struggle that left much of the South in ashes and ended its hope of creating a new confederacy of states on the North American continent.

Confederacy

If you want a truly sanitized look at the American Civil War then let AARP show you the way…..https://www.aarp.org/politics-society/history/info-04-2011/8-ways-civil-war-changed-lives.html

Now let’s look beyond the sanitation of the events of 1861-1865……the Confederacy…..

For the four years of its existence, until it was forced to surrender, the Confederate States of America was a pro-slavery nation at war against the United States. The C.S.A. was a big, centralized state, devoted to securing a society in which enslavement to white people was the permanent and inherited condition of all people of African descent.

The Confederates built an explicitly white-supremacist, pro-slavery, and antidemocratic nation-state, dedicated to the principle that all men are not created equal. Emboldened by what they saw as the failure of emancipation in other parts of the world, buoyed by the new science of race, and convinced that the American vision of the people had been terribly betrayed, they sought the kind of future for human slavery and conservative republican government that was no longer possible within the United States. This is the cause that the statues honor.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/06/confederacy-wasnt-what-you-think/613309/

There you have the facts about the Confederacy.

Now a little extra for this post…..could the Civil War ended earlier than 1865?

In fact, some of the war’s finest scholars, and more than a few ‘armchair historians’ as well, have explored all manner of ‘what if’ scenarios. And playing these sorts of guessing games carries risks – anyone bold enough to hypothesize is often greeted with scorn, derision and ridicule. After all, Civil War buffs are a passionate breed!

Nevertheless – and grasping full well the firestorm such speculation often ignites among aficionados of the period – I will offer up a few speculations of my own, stipulating as I do, that they are my own humble opinions, and nothing more.

Missed Opportunities – Four Battles That Might Have Ended the U.S. Civil War Long Before 1865

Could the war had been avoided with a bit of a compromise?

The only compromise that could have headed off war by then was for the Southern states to forgo secession and agree to abolition. Conceivably Lincoln would have agreed to gradual abolition to avoid war; he certainly believed before the war began that he lacked the constitutional authority to emancipate the slaves unilaterally.

Once the Confederate states seceded and troops fired on Fort Sumter, the only solution possible was complete Southern surrender. And as the war continued, and slavery became an explicit justification for the conflict, emancipation became central to a resolution.

https://www.history.com/news/could-compromise-have-prevented-the-civil-war

Learn Stuff!

Class Dismissed!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

3 thoughts on “The Confederacy

  1. I’m gonna be tackling Confederate history in the next few months for sure, so there’s much I kinda remember and things I just picked up that I’m trying to sort through. What I noticed when learning about the Confederate government in high school (what little I could learn) is that it was aptly named: a loose-confederation of states under a weak central government. I remember thinking that it sounded a helluva lot like the U.S.’s first stab at a government system under the Articles of Confederation, whereby the states had far more power than the central government to the point where the central government couldn’t get much done. I remembered reading on the Confederacy and how each state was vying for it’s own position as most important or supreme, and mostly only took care of it’s own state’s troops, though fighting went all over the map. One brief segment I remembered was a quoted account that the central government was so cash strapped that when a supply officer came to the war office (I think) to ask for supplies, the guy in charge basically emptied his wallet for the soldier and said that was the Confederate treasury. Guess we know which region wanted to keep the states stronger than the government post-Revolutionary War the most, huh?

    I haven’t read Jefferson Davis’ doorstops yet on the Confederate government, but I’m really curious how it’ll turn out. Gonna probably have to tackle it next year, just too many other books i need to read first (books that will be less of a headache).

    (Speaking of headaches, I now wonder which jailhouse-written rambling, screaming, racist text would be harder to read without getting migraines or the desire to shoot the damn book: Davis’ “Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government” or Hitler’s “Mein Kampf”? Hmm…)

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