December 11, 1941

A day late!

Thanx to my medical thing I was late posting this small history lesson…..I apologize for my tardiness……

Four days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Germany’s Hitler made his first grand mistake……

Four days after Pearl Harbor, in arguably the most insane and pivotal decision in history, Adolf Hitler needlessly declared war on the United States.

December 7, 1941, a distracted Hitler was at “Wolf’s Lair” his gloomy, dank Eastern Front field headquarters in Prussia, absorbing the reality that his Russian campaign, launched with stunning success and fanfare less than six months earlier, had permanently stalled within sight of Moscow, a mere five miles from the Kremlin’s Onion Domes—on December 2.

http://www.thehistoryreader.com/modern-history/december-111941-hitler-arguably-insane-pivotal-decision-history/

A Hitler “oh shit” moment!

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The Return of the Madman Theory

A little trip into the past…the recent past….an interesting look unto what could possibly happen with all the chaos boil up around the president.

Is Donald Trump reviving the “madman theory” of diplomacy, introduced by Richard Nixon to instill fear in America’s adversaries? North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s description of Trump as “mentally deranged” suggests that such a ploy might be working – or else Kim is more right than he, or the rest of us, would like.

In the 1970s, US President Richard Nixon instructed Secretary of State Henry Kissinger to convince the leaders of hostile communist countries that he could be erratic and volatile, particularly when under pressure. Kissinger, a shrewd practitioner of Realpolitik, saw the potential in this approach, which he readily implemented. With that, the “madman theory” of diplomacy was born.

In the 1970s, US President Richard Nixon instructed Secretary of State Henry Kissinger to convince the leaders of hostile communist countries that he could be erratic and volatile, particularly when under pressure. Kissinger, a shrewd practitioner of Realpolitik, saw the potential in this approach, which he readily implemented. With that, the “madman theory” of diplomacy was born.Nixon was far from mad, though his heavy drinking at the height of the Watergate scandal prompted Kissinger and Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger to establish a way to monitor his control of the nuclear codes. Nixon’s goal in trumpeting his supposed erratic nature was to stoke fear among his foreign adversaries that making him angry or stressed could result in an irrational – even nuclear – response, thereby impelling them to check their own behavior.

Source: The Return of the Madman Theory by Nina L. Khrushcheva – Project Syndicate

Closing Thought–07Dec17

Do Americans Remember World War One?

The quick answer would be…NO!

We are in the middle of the 100 year remembrance of that war….the Great War….The War To End All Wars….and very little mention of the war is ever uttered here in the US…..a few far between documentaries on the war but for the most part few remember the war at all.

But that may change a bit.

There is is in the process a monument to commemorate the war to be complete in 2018……

There are no World War I veterans left alive in the US, but a century after the conflict that reshaped the world, ground has broken on a new monument in Washington, DC, to the 4.5 million Americans who served.

The US entered the war in 1917 – almost three years after European powers had been bludgeoning themselves to near destruction. Some 53,000 US soldiers were killed in combat, according to the defence department, while 64,000 died off the battlefield, including deaths from the influenza epidemic. Another 200,000 were wounded.

At the time, few Americans wanted to join a conflict largely thought to be pointless and irrelevant. Despite its profound impact on what became the “American Century”, World War I remains a marginal war for many in the US.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42160971

Me?  I try to keep it on the minds of my readers for I am fascinated with the war itself……how the same tactics were used over and ovber and the loss of so many lives is just staggering to me.

I am glad to see that there is someone that remembers that war and the devastating toll it took on human life…..

I must go down for the evening..,..hope all will have a good and restful night and will see everyone tomorrow on this very page…..Peace and good night…..chuq

An Alternative Strategy

From time to time I offer up a “what if”….a historic look at events that might have changed the world if a different course had been charted…..this is a fine piece written about the 9/11 attacks and the aftermath…..it makes a bunch of excellent points to consider…..

It is a lengthy article but well worth the time to read…….

You’ve heard the platitude that hindsight is 20/20. It’s true enough and, though I’ve been a regular skeptic about what policymakers used to call the Global War on Terror, it’s always easier to poke holes in the past than to say what you would have done. My conservative father was the first to ask me what exactly I would have suggested on September 12, 2001, and he’s pressed me to write this article for years. The supposed rub is this: under the pressure of that attack and the burden of presidential responsibility, even “liberals” — like me, I guess — would have made much the same decisions as George W. Bush and company.

Many readers may cringe at the thought, but former National Security Adviser and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has to be taken seriously when she suggests that anyone in the White House on 9/11 would inevitably have seen the world through the lens of the Bush administration. I’ve long argued that just about every Bush-era policy that followed 9/11 was an unqualified disaster. Nevertheless, it remains important to ponder the weight piled upon a president in the wake of unprecedented terror attacks. What would you have done? What follows is my best crack at that thorny question, 16 years after the fact, and with the accumulated experiences of combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/42724-what-if-an-alternative-strategy-for-9-12-2001

I spend a lot of time second guessing our foreign policy establishment…..to me they have not made a good or an accurate decision in 25 years…..and a continuation of an unwinnable war is just what I am referring to……not a good decision in decades.

“A Day In Infamy”

Today is 07 December 2017……76 years ago the Japanese attack Pear Harbor and landed the US smack dab in the middle of World War Two.

Yes, Irene this is going to be a history lesson…like it or not……

It was whaling, sugar and pineapples that first brought Pearl Harbor to America’s attention.

At the whaling industry’s peak in 1846, nearly 800 whaling vessels made port calls in the Hawaiian Islands, mostly U.S.-flagged ships, according to Navy history and heritage command. The Navy was ordered to send regular patrols around the islands to protect the commercial whaling ships from pirates or rival nations.

The impact on Hawaii, an exotic land where natives farmed and fished for centuries, was dramatic. Ship repair facilities cropped up, and Honolulu and Lahaina became bustling towns catering to hungry, thirsty and sometimes rowdy sailors. Bakeries, laundries, carpenter shops, blacksmiths and boarding houses sprang up overnight, according to a Navy history command account of those years.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2016/12/03/pearl-harbor-history/94039096/

Take a few moments out of your day to remember all those that fought and died for this country……they will forever br “The Greatest Generation”.

5 Greatest Foreign Policy Presidents

Yep my friends that time again…..Professor’s Classroom is in session.

This time we will talk about the best foreign policy presidents in our history.

The American Conservative rates the best foreign policy presidents, the 5 best, now I do not agree and will explain why after you read the article…..

The American president is the individual primarily responsible for the United States’ foreign policy. While the president divvies up domestic issues with Congress and the states, the Constitution gives the president broad power to command the armed forces, make treaties, and appoint diplomats. Furthermore, in accordance with the War Powers Resolution of 1973, the president can deploy troops for up to 60 days without congressional approval.

In this author’s view, a good foreign policy is one that serves America’s interests, that is, the security of the nation and the prosperity of its people, and a good American foreign policy president is one who understanding this, acts according, rather than pursuing idealistic fantasies. America’s interests change in different times and places, so realism means different things to different presidents, and encompasses a broad range of policies. But realism does not mean an open-ended war on a strategy, terrorism, nor does it mean constant interventionism aimed at changing the domestic institutions of other countries. Of course, the United States can still serve as an exemplar for other countries.

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-five-best-u-s-foreign-policy-presidents/

I disagree on several levels….Lincoln had no foreign policy to speak of, TR was good tactician but not in foreign policy and Nixon should be eliminated because of Vietnam if for on other reason.

I think that FDR should be there while I may not agree with some of his decisions he still had foreign policy chops……lastly I think Carter should be on that list….yes he had some set backs with the Iranian situation…he is the closest that peace has ever been in the Holy Land….who knows what would have happened if he had been re-elected.

That is my take on the best foreign policy presidents….would you care to take a stab at it?

Operation Paperclip

At the end of World War 2 the US ran all over Germany snapping up German scientists, most of whom would be tried for crimes against humanity but their expertise was needed so Operation paperclip protected these criminals and moved most of them to the US under the protection of the government.

More about Operation paperclip here…..

Operation Paperclip, named after the use of the ordinary paperclip attached to the personnel files of select German scientists, was a special operation of breathtaking scope. Instead of highly trained teams tasked for important combat missions, these teams were hunters and gatherers sifting and searching through the wreckage and ruin of a devastated Germany. Theirs was a high-stakes contest against an equally determined Russia and other less malevolent former allies. German scientists and technologies were the pawns, and the prize was nothing less than national security and preeminence as a world power. When it was concluded, hundreds of German scientists and their families, tons of documents, hardware, weapon systems, and technologies would be transferred from Germany to the United States.

Officially, Operation Paperclip concluded on Sept. 30, 1947. In a public statement, the Army announced that the operation had brought into the United States 457 scientists and 453 dependents. But a closed-door decision was made to allow Operation Paperclip to continue, this time as a top secret program. To justify the continuation, the Air Force stated that the 209 German scientists working for it had substantially advanced the development of weapons systems and the scientists were “superlative specialists … the best available in the world today.” They were saving the Air Force millions of dollars and an estimated 10 years in cost and development. The Navy added its praise, stating that German mathematicians, aerodynamicists, and experts in heat transfer had proven that “their professional education and training [were]superior to that of any U.S. personnel available.”

https://argunners.com/operation-paperclip-saving-german-scientists/

Some of the research that America used in their space program was testing done on Jewish prisoners that resulted in a horrific death and yet we decided that it was somehow okay to use this research if it put us a head of the Russians.

I personally have a problem with this type of program….a war criminal is a war criminal and should face the same judgements that others had to face.

Thoughts?