50 Years Ago

“It was 50 years ago today
Sergeant Pepper taught the band to play,
They’ve been going in and out of style,
But they’re guaranteed to raise the smile,
So may I introduce to you,”

Sorry I digress….a short trip down Memory Lane….

But speaking of protests as I did earlier….a little history……

As a young man I was an antiwar activist…I had witnessed war first hand and wanted to see the whole concept disappear…..I have heard people say that protests do very little in the grand scheme of things……I dis agree….

Ergo 50 years ago this Autumn……

“Demonstrations don’t work.” Next time you hear someone (or yourself) say that, you might consider the Moratorium and Mobilization demonstrations in the fall of 1969 — both commemorating their 50th anniversaries this year.

On Oct.15, 1969, more than two million citizens took part in the Moratorium — a one-day national strike against the war. In hundreds of cities, towns and campuses throughout the country, people from all walks of life took the day off to march, rally, vigil or engage in teach-ins. Until the Women’s March of 2017, the Moratorium held the title as the biggest nationwide demonstration in American history.

Exactly a month later, on Nov. 15, more than a half-million war opponents flooded the nation’s capital for the Mobilization. That was more than double the number of marchers who participated in the famous 1963 March on Washington led by Martin Luther King, Jr. More than 100,000 rallied in a simultaneous antiwar demonstration in San Francisco.

How anti-Vietnam War protests thwarted Nixon’s plans and saved lives

Do not let them (whoever them are) tell you protests do not work….they do and the American people need to remember that and act accordingly.

In closing a bit of protest musical interlude……

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Ukraine For Dummies

Ukraine this and Ukraine that…..but what do most Americans really know about the country and the region?

First a general description…… Ukraine was the center of the first eastern Slavic state, Kyivan Rus, which during the 10th and 11th centuries was the largest and most powerful state in Europe. Weakened by internecine quarrels and Mongol invasions, Kyivan Rus was incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and eventually into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The cultural and religious legacy of Kyivan Rus laid the foundation for Ukrainian nationalism through subsequent centuries. A new Ukrainian state, the Cossack Hetmanate, was established during the mid-17th century after an uprising against the Poles. Despite continuous Muscovite pressure, the Hetmanate managed to remain autonomous for well over 100 years. During the latter part of the 18th century, most Ukrainian ethnographic territory was absorbed by the Russian Empire. Following the collapse of czarist Russia in 1917, Ukraine achieved a short-lived period of independence (1917-20), but was reconquered and endured a brutal Soviet rule that engineered two forced famines (1921-22 and 1932-33) in which over 8 million died. In World War II, German and Soviet armies were responsible for 7 to 8 million more deaths. Although Ukraine achieved independence in 1991 with the dissolution of the USSR, democracy and prosperity remained elusive as the legacy of state control and endemic corruption stalled efforts at economic reform, privatization, and civil liberties.

Now a map of the region…….

Image result for Ukraine images

For those that may not completely understand the history or the situation then maybe a short refresher course will be of some help……..

So here is a kind of primer for those who might be interested in some Ukraine history:

  • Late 1700s: Catherine the Great consolidated her rule; established Russia’s first and only warm-water naval base in Crimea.
  • In 1919, after the Bolshevik Revolution, Moscow defeated resistance in Ukraine and the country becomes one of 15 Republics of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR).
  • In 1954, after Stalin’s death the year before, Nikita Khrushchev, a Ukrainian, assumed power. Pandering to Ukrainian supporters, he unilaterally decreed that henceforth Crimea would be part of the Ukrainian SSR, not the Russian SSR. Since all 15 Republics of the USSR were under tight rule from Moscow, the switch was a distinction without much of a difference – until later, when the USSR fell apart.

Read On…….

Ukraine for Dummies

Hopefully since the MSM will not explain the situation completely this may help my readers in some small way.

Learn Stuff!

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Message For Veterans Day

A day set aside to honor our veterans would be the perfect time for the resurrection of the antiwar movement….

It wasn’t supposed to be this way; wasn’t meant to be celebrated as such – as Veterans’ Day, that is. When the guns fell silent after more than four years of slaughter in the Great War – which consumed at least 9 million soldiers’ lives – in a widely celebrated, long-awaited armistice, veterans, and even many leaders, swore off war once and for all. Sure lots of the Wilsonian rhetoric of war “to end all wars,” was probably always hyperbolic and politically opportunistic. Nonetheless, it’s remarkable how many veterans and victims of that war truly believed it, were even dedicated to ensure this was so.

Thus, until the Second World War shattered those expectations, and governments around the world then waged near endless wars in the half century afterwards, the Americans, and other peoples celebrated the anniversary of the Great Wars’ end as Armistice Day. By it’s very nature, it was, then, imbued with meaning, with hopes, dreams, demands for a more peaceful future. Here in the U.S. those sentiments are long gone. Their morbid obituary America’s 19+ years of hopeless wars since 9/11. What we’re left with is a rebranded shell of a holiday: Veterans’ Day.

The Armistice We Need: Time for Vets To Reclaim Veterans’ Day

Reclaim the day for our veterans…..commercialization has turn the day into something it was never intended to be…..please help the Veterans For Peace to reclaim the day in the name of the veteran….

Veterans For Peace has been celebrating Armistice Day almost since the organization’s inception, with a few chapters doing yearly events.  However, in 2008 the effort became a national effort with the passage of an official Veterans For Peace resolution.  Since then, chapters across the country have been “Reclaiming Armistice Day” pushing the celebration of peace into the national conversation on Veterans Day.

Over one hundred years ago the world celebrated peace as a universal principle.  The first World War had just ended and nations mourning their dead collectively called for an end to all wars.  Armistice Day was born and was designated as “a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated.”

https://www.veteransforpeace.org/take-action/armistice-day

Our veterans deserve better than a ‘thank you’ once a year….or a “white Sale” named after them…..

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Remembering World War One

What we call Veterans Day was originally designed to celebrate the end of the Great War….on the 11th hour or the 11th day of the 11th month….

We Americans have lost the meaning behind the day and the celebrations….it is more about a “White Sale” or deep discounts on a new truck than the people that fought our many wars.

The legacy and the cost of that war is all but forgotten…..so on this Veterans Day of 2019 I would like to offer a remembrance of World War One……

World War I was the first industrial war: poison gases, flamethrowers, aerial bombing, submarines, and machine guns intensified the scale of war wreckage and war dead, setting the norm for 20th and 21st century wars. By government policy, British war dead were not sent home lest the public turn against the war. Instead they were buried in vast graveyards near battle sites in France and Belgium. Even today Belgian and French farmers plowing fields in places of intense, interminable fighting and mass death on the Western Front unearth an estimated ½ million pounds of war debris and soldiers’ bones each year. (During the Afghanistan and Iraq wars Pentagon policy prohibited media coverage of US war dead arriving at Dover Air Base in Delaware until the ban was lifted, with conditions, in 2015. Many regarded the ban, like the Word War 1 British policy, as hiding the human cost of war that could turn the public against the war.)

From the unyielding ugliness and butchery of World War I emerged soldier poets, notable among them Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, whose unsparing style and content separated them from the tradition of glorifying war. These soldier poets, living in a trench war fraught with dead bodies and rats that fattened on them and with rear guard commanders who sent battalions of teenage boys into the slaughter of machine gun fire, rebuked their country’s warmongering politicians and industrial profiteers. (Likewise today, the majority of veterans of US wars in Afghanistan and Iraq – in stark contrast to politicians of both parties – agree that the wars they fought wasted human lives and achieved no human progress.)

November 11: Remembering the Tragedy and Legacy of World War I

Take a few moments out of your busy day and remember all that has been given by our veterans….

A poem that describes the horror of WW1

https://lobotero.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/a4cb8-flandersfield.jpg

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

A History Sunday

Most readers of IST know that I am a history buff and a foreign policy wonk….so I would like to pass on some historic stuff that I have been saving for a rainy day….

Today, 10 November, the Marine Corps is founded in 1775……Cavalry hero Maj. Reno is court martial for being a peeping tom in 1879…..1969 Sesame Street debuts…..the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald 1975…….

One of the most devastating weapons introduced in World War One was the machine gun…..his name was Hiram Maxim…..

HIRAM MAXIM WAS a prolific American inventor. During his lifetime, he devised mousetraps, curling irons, steam pumps, bronchitis inhalers, and even an amusement park ride. He also tinkered with powered flight, early radio technology and light bulbs.

It wasn’t until 1882 however that the 42-year-old inventor conceived his most famous creation.

“I was in Vienna, where I met an American whom I had known in the States,” Maxim told the Times of London. “He said: ‘Hang your chemistry and electricity! If you want to make a pile of money, invent something that will enable these Europeans to cut each other’s throats with greater facility.’ ”

Over the course of the next three years, Maxim toiled in his London workshop and, lo, the Maxim machine gun was born.

Machine Gun — How Hiram Maxim’s Deadly Invention Changed History

LSMFT!  Old Gold……Chesterfield……war made these items popuar…I am talking about cigarettes….

On July 11, many thousands of people heard a fascinating story on NPR and WBUR’s Here and Now radio program, in which two esteemed historians asserted that Americans never would have been as dependent as they are on tobacco were it not for the considerable support of the U.S. government. To many, this was surely a surprising assertion, since Big Tobacco is often perceived to be at odds with big government, with its regulations and disclosure requirements and general aversion to its citizens getting sick and dying. There was only one problem: the two historians, both men, did not credit the source of the story—another historian, a woman named Sarah Milov, and her new book, The Cigarette: A Political History.

https://newrepublic.com/article/155164/war-made-cigarette

More history will have to wait for I still have a tangerine crop that needs picking….

Image

But before that can happen I need to handle another situation…..I believe someone is telling me it is time for that walk I promised about 30 minutes ago……

Image

Got to go…..TTFN

P.S. this is tangerines off of one tree……

Image

And there is more waiting…….

Have a great Sunday and relax for next week will be a busy week…..chuq

And The Wall Came Tumbling Down

09November in Germany is filled with lots of history….I shall let Padre Steve take on from that statement…..https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/770114/posts/2478338726

This is a bit of a departure from normal posting technique for IST…but it is a historic event…and we love history…..

Nope not some religious rant about he walls of Jericho….something more important…the 30 year anniversary of the beginning of the end…….first the Berlin Wall….09 November 1989 the wall came tumbling down.

Least we NOT forget.

First we should know the history of why it was erected at all….and then why it came down…..

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-berlin-wall-28-year-history-1779495

Try to remember that events of that November…..

Nearly 30 years ago, in the night of November 9-10, 1989, East German border police opened the gates at crossing points in the Berlin Wall, allowing masses of East Berliners to stream through them unhindered.

This started a night of unbridled celebrations as people crossed freely back and forth through the Cold War barrier, climbed on it, and even danced and partied on it.

The signal for the mass breach of the previously heavily guarded wall was a fumbled announcement in a press conference by the Socialist Unity Party (SED) Party chief of Berlin, Günter Schabowski.

https://theconversation.com/world-politics-explainer-the-fall-of-the-berlin-wall-100812

Will this day be remembered?

The fall promised a bright new world without the USSR and the divisive politics that the Cold War brought about.

You know, it’s strange. There are certain moments that you and everyone in your generation never forget. For instance, I can tell you exactly where I was – eating a 25-cent hamburger in a diner that might have been called the Yankee Doodle in New Haven, Connecticut – when a man stuck his head in the front door and said, “The president’s been shot.” That, of course, was John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, and I have little doubt that, if you asked just about anyone else my age, they’d have a remarkably specific memory of that moment, too.

But here’s the strange thing that TomDispatch regular and former Boston Globe columnist James Carroll brought to my mind with today’s piece on what may qualify as the single most important historical event of my life: the dismantling of the Berlin Wall. I have no idea what I was doing or where I was that November 9th in 1989 when I first heard that the forever structure dividing East from West that symbolized the two-superpower world of the Cold War was coming down. I have just vague memories of TV images of crowds surging and the wall being whacked at by people with sledgehammers

What the Dismantling of the Berlin Wall Means 30 Years Later

A good retrospective……for those that would like to remember….

It was on 9 November 1989, five days after half a million people gathered in East Berlin in a mass protest, that the Berlin Wall dividing communist East Germany from West Germany crumbled.

East German leaders had tried to calm mounting protests by loosening the borders, making travel easier for East Germans. They had not intended to open the border up completely.

The changes were meant to be fairly minor – but the way they were delivered had major consequences.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-50013048

It appears that this event means NOTHING….and why should it….it only changed the world as we had known it and gave way to the crippling globalization with which  we have a love/hate relationship….so why look back?  Why try to remember what went wrong/right?

I was eating dinner of a ‘Wheel Burger’, a local famous burger and fries and watched the TV as I dined and enjoying my ice cold Miller….how about you?

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Corruption: Presidential Perspective

There is lots of noise these days about the Trump admin and how corrupt it has become…..but what about the other presidents that are said to have been corrupted as well?

A couple of cabinets that come to mind are Harding, Grant and Jackson…but could there be others?

Throughout American history, some presidents have had better taste than others when selecting the members of their Cabinets. The president’s Cabinet includes the vice president plus the heads of the departments of the executive branch of the government. With all those Cabinet members, sometimes not everybody has the best interests of the nation at heart.

Read on to discover which presidents appointed the most corrupt Cabinets. And get the details on how President Donald Trump’s Cabinet compares on page 7.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/culture/presidents-with-corrupt-cabinets-and-how-donald-trump-compares.html/

Along the same lines as corrupt is the fact that some of the same presidents are considered some of the most notorious in our short history…..

From Richard M Nixon, who resigned following the Watergate scandal, to the impeached Andrew Johnson, historian Adam IP Smith considers five of America’s most disreputable presidents…

https://www.historyextra.com/period/modern/the-5-most-notorious-presidents-in-us-history/

I always like to see the story of our presidents side by side……comparisons is always a good thing….helps presidents live up to the potential that the voters gave them…..unfortunately some have not lived up to their potential.

Be Smart!

Learn Stuff!

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”