Making American (History) Great Again–Part 36

I have been giving my readers a history lesson….a good look at the history not necessarily taught in our schools and universities……that history is not as cut and dry as we are taught.

Maj. Sjursen has taken us from the early days of the republic to the present day…..this part takes us into the “forever war” years of GW Bush or Bush II….but before we get to those days I need to help a new reader get caught up with the saga so far…..

Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5; Part 6; Part 7; Part 8; Part 9; Part 10;Part 11; Part 12; Part 13; Part 14; Part 15; Part 16; Part 17; Part 18; Part 19; Part 20; Part 21; Part 22; Part 23; Part 24; Part 25; Part 26; Part 27; Part 28; Part 29; Part 30; Part 31; Part 32; Part 33; Part 34; Part 35.

Now we are ready to take on the presidency of GW Bush…..GW….Baby Bush…..we went to war his first year in office and we have been there ever since……

George W. Bush’s presidency forever changed the lives of millions at home and around the globe. (I, as a career Army officer, was one of those impacted.) Were it not for him, there would never have been long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The profound policy decisions of Bush prove the importance of presidential agency, the power of a single man to forever alter history. It was all rather ironic. Bush had run, in the 2000 election, on a platform of “compassionate conservatism”—a softening, of sorts, of the Republican dogma that had characterized the culture wars of the 1990s. He had even criticized the military interventionism of his predecessor, President Bill Clinton, and eschewed “nation-building” missions around the globe. Yet Bush would be one of the most zealous, and polarizing, conservatives in presidential history and would unleash American military might on an unprecedented scale. On his watch, it can be said without exaggeration, the U.S. shifted from covert to overt imperialism.

American History for Truthdiggers: Bush II and the Birth of Forever War

“These are the days that try men’s souls”….famous words by a famous writer…..we are coming to an end of this series, at least for now, what happens after GW is groundbreaking on so many levels.

Please take some time to read the series….I know it is a lot but you will learn stuff….so be smart.

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Those ‘Forgotten’ Presidents

The US has had some giants among men as presidents, right?

A presidential friend once was asked if his friend was up to the job of the American president……and his reply is priceless…..Harry Daugherty said, “Don’t make me laugh. The days of giants in the presidential chair is passed. Our so-called Great Presidents were all made by the conditions of war under which they administered the office. Greatness in the president is largely an illusion of the people.”

Keep hold of that statement.

This post is about the underrated presidents that we had in our country……..Harding, Polk, Jefferson (believe it or not), McKinley and Grant.

Historians make the president in our memories….but were they all that memorable?

Although Americans love to trash their most hated presidents, this list is dedicated to appreciating the men who very capably served as president, but have been criticized or under-appreciated by both historians and modern Americans. Each man on this list has warts and flaws, but all strengthened and improved his country in at least one key way.

Top Five: Underrated Presidents

I do not agree with them but then this article is an opinion and you may not agree either.

My list is Carter and Carter alone but then I am not a presidential historian just my personal opinion based on his policies.

I am sure that you have some thoughts on this as well…..What say you?

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Making American (History) Great Again–Part 35

For almost a year how I have been giving my readers an “alternate” look at American history…..that is not what the mainstream media and most reactionary history teachers are willing to depart to the people.

Maj. Sjersen is a historian and history professor and his series is well worth the time to read and get the “rest of the story” when it comes to American history……in case you have missed the series then this will help get you caught up…..

Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5; Part 6; Part 7; Part 8; Part 9; Part 10;Part 11; Part 12; Part 13; Part 14; Part 15; Part 16; Part 17; Part 18; Part 19; Part 20; Part 21; Part 22; Part 23; Part 24; Part 25; Part 26; Part 27; Part 28; Part 29; Part 30; Part 31; Part 32; Part 33; Part 34.

As the 20th century churns to a close we elected the most corporate friendly president, Bill Clinton…..and he is a Democrat.

I did not vote for Clinton and did not approve or support his policies……his policies created the crash of 2008…..his policies lead to the creation of the corporate media that now controls all we see and hear……

He was bright, he knew the details of domestic policy in and out, and he was a natural politician. William Jefferson Clinton, the “man from Hope,” Ark., grew up poor and rose to spectacular and unexpected heights. But he was also deeply insecure and obsessively needed to be liked, and, ultimately, it was unclear just what, if anything, the man believed in. Although Bill Clinton dreamed of being a great president, in the vein (he thought) of John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt, his abundant ambition was not enough to produce that result. But whatever his failures as a leader and a person, he reached voters, “felt their pain” and, on the surface at least, seemed to possess a common touch, an everyman empathy that drew multitudes to him. Having grown up among black people in Arkansas, he seemed particularly comfortable around African Americans, leading the famed novelist Toni Morrison to dub him “the first black president.” In time, she, and many of  her fellow African Americans, undoubtedly came to regret those words as Clinton’s rather conservative, “New Democrat” policies proved to be disastrous for most blacks in the United States.

American History for Truthdiggers: Bill Clinton, the ‘New Democrat’

This series a terrific look into the making of this country and the people.

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Making America (History) Great Again–Part 34

I enjoy history and American history particularly….as a nation we have been through so much and we are still evolving…some say devolving…..the series written by Maj. Danny Sjursen is an excellent look at history from a slightly different perspective than mainstream.

Sjursen has taken the readers from the early days of this nation to the days of yore that we now live in……to help my readers I would like to give them the series so far……

Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5; Part 6; Part 7; Part 8; Part 9; Part 10; Part 11; Part 12; Part 13; Part 14; Part 15; Part 16; Part 17; Part 18; Part 19; Part 20; Part 21; Part 22; Part 23; Part 24; Part 25; Part 26; Part 27; Part 28; Part 29; Part 30; Part 31; Part 32; Part 33.

Please take some time and get caught up on the series……

Maj. Danny now looks at the Bush 41 years……

His vice president was everything Ronald Reagan was not. The Hollywood actor in chief had far less political qualification “on paper” than his 1980 Republican primary opponent, George H.W. Bush. Though Reagan oozed optimism and soothed the American people with his confident, digestible rhetoric, he was certainly no policy expert or Washington insider. Bush was both. He was a man born of privilege, scion of a prestigious, wealthy family and son of a Republican U.S. senator from Connecticut, Prescott Bush. However, the mid-20th century was different from our own time; it was an era when affluence and social standing didn’t obviate a sense of duty to country and family honor. Bush, like so many thousands of the other members of the American aristocracy, volunteered for the U.S. military in response to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

American History for Truthdiggers: Bush 41—Struggling in Reagan’s Shadow

I was not a supporter of Bush and worked hard to try and defeat him….he was replaced by Clinton…..and I cannot take credit for that for I was not a Clinton fan either.

But all that aside….I almost long for the discipline and issues of those days…..of Bush 41…… for we have nothing but slogans, insults and Tweeting….

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Summer 1919

Closing Thought–24July19

Happy Birthday Mom….she would have been 98….I miss you.

A hundred years ago history was made…..it was made but seldom taught nor spoken of in most circles…..it is known as the “Red Summer”…..

America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened.

It flowed in small towns like Elaine, Arkansas, in medium-size places such as Annapolis, Maryland, and Syracuse, New York, and in big cities like Washington and Chicago. Hundreds of African American men, women and children were burned alive, shot, lynched or beaten to death by white mobs. Thousands saw their homes and businesses burned to the ground and were driven out, many never to return.

It was branded “Red Summer” because of the bloodshed and amounted to some of the worst white-on-black violence in U.S. history.

America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened. It flowed in small towns like Elaine, Arkansas, in medium-size places such as Annapolis, Maryland, and Syracuse, New York, and in big cities like Washington and Chicago. Hundreds of African American men, women and children were burned alive, shot, hanged or beaten to death by white mobs. Thousands saw their homes and businesses burned to the ground and were driven out, many never to return. It was branded “Red Summer” because of the bloodshed and amounted to some of the worst white-on-black violence in US history. Beyond the lives and family fortunes lost, it had far-reaching repercussions, contributing to generations of black distrust of white authority. But it also galvanized blacks to defend themselves and their neighborhoods with fists and guns; reinvigorated civil rights organizations like the NAACP and led to a new era of activism; gave rise to courageous reporting by black journalists; and influenced the generation of leaders who would take up the fight for racial equality decades later.

“The people who were the icons of the civil rights movement were raised by the people who survived Red Summer,” said Saje Mathieu, a history professor at the University of Minnesota. For all that, there are no national observances marking Red Summer. History textbooks ignore it, and most museums don’t acknowledge it. The reason: Red Summer contradicts the post-World War I-era notion that America was making the world safe for democracy, historians say. But that could change, the AP reports. A monument has been proposed in Arkansas. Several authors have written about the bloody summer. A Brooklyn choral group performed Red Summer-theme songs like “And They Lynched Him on a Tree” in March to commemorate the centennial. At the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mathieu and an author plan to present some of their findings July 30. (The AP’s full story is worth a read)

Ask ten people what the Red Summer was about and you will get answers but none would be accurate.

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Making America (History) Great Again–Part 33

The continuing series of American history…..a look at history of this country that few will read or believe….but like all things historical it is all about the illusion.

Maj. Sjursen is a historian with a good eye for American history in the vain of Howard Zinn…..

This part is about the so-called Reagan Revolution….not a time that I believe did anything for the nation but rather for the deep pockets of Wall Street.

This nation has not recovered from the screwing it took for the 8 years of Reagan…….

But before we get into the meat of this time and if my readers would like to get caught up…..

Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5; Part 6; Part 7; Part 8; Part 9; Part 10; Part 11; Part 12; Part 13; Part 14; Part 15; Part 16; Part 17; Part 18; Part 19; Part 20; Part 21; Part 22; Part 23; Part 24; Part 25; Part 26; Part 27; Part 28; Part 29; Part 30; Part 31; Part 32.

It was no accident. Indeed, candidate Ronald Reagan knew exactly what he was doing. It was August 1980, at the height of presidential election fever. Visiting Mississippi, once a symbol of the solid Democratic South, Reagan chose the Neshoba County Fair for a key campaign speech. To beat incumbent President Jimmy Carter, he would have to turn the Deep South Republican. The fair was in the same county as Philadelphia, Miss., and only seven miles from that town, forever associated with the murder of three civil rights activists (one black and two white) just 16 years earlier. It was a bold move by Reagan. Stepping up for the occasion, he railed about big government and thundered in ever-so-coded language, “I believe in states’ rights.” In a state that still proudly flew the Confederate Battle Flag, no doubt the mostly white crowd of some 15,000 knew, and loved, the racial undertones of such a statement. The states’ rights mantra had long amounted to little more than a justification of racism by another name. The only right many states tended to focus on was their right to suppress black voting and maintain the segregation of public life.

American History for Truthdiggers: The Reagan Revolution

Trickle Down economics is still the preferred GOP method of solutions and in all these years it has solved not one problem….and the country still suffers from the lies of the GOP and Reagan.

Closing Thought–18Jul19

WE have just celebrated the Declaration of Independence which help set this nation on the road to freedom from Mother England.

The most important document of this era was the publishing of Common Sense by Thomas Paine….if one reads the document they will notice much that much of it was is also in the DoI……check it out here….

Common Sense is a political pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775-76 and published anonymously on January 10, 1776, during the beginning of the American Revolution.  Common Sense advocated that the thirteen original colonies (which later became the United States) gain independence from Great Britain. In his pamphlet, Paine makes a passionate case for independence by focusing on moral and political arguments. For almost three months, Paine managed to maintain his anonymity and did not become officially connected with the independence controversy until March 30, 1776.

In the first section of Common Sense, Paine makes a distinction between society and government, arguing that government is a “necessary evil.” As society continues to evolve, Paine feels that a government becomes necessary in order to prevent the natural evil  in humankind, and accordingly, he sees the need for laws. He explains that order must be  promoted in a civil society. Further, laws must take into consideration the impossibility of all people in a society meeting centrally to make laws. Therefore representation and elections become necessary. This model is intended to mirror the situation of the colonists at the time of publication and Paine references the Constitution of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. However, Paine identifies two tyrannies in the British constitution—monarchical and aristocratic tyranny, where those in power rule by heredity and contribute nothing to the people. He clearly detests this.

In the second section, Paine evaluates monarchy.  He begins by arguing that all men are equal at the time of creation and, therefore, the distinction between kings and subjects (as in England) is an inherently false distinction. Paine then examines some of the problems that kings and monarchies have caused in the past and concludes the following: “In England a king hath little more to do than to make war and give away places; which in plain terms, is to impoverish the nation and set it together by the ears.  A pretty business indeed for a man to be allowed eight hundred thousand sterling a year for, and worshipped into the bargain! Of more worth is one honest man to society and in the sight of God, than all the crowned ruffians that ever lived.”

In the third section, Paine examines hostilities between England and the American colonies and argues that the best course of action would be independence for the colonists. Paine proposes a Continental Charter that he states “should come from some intermediate body between the Congress and the people.” This Continental Charter should outline a new national government, which Paine argues should take the form of a Congress. Paine suggests that a Congress might be created in the following way: each colony could be divided in districts and each district would “send a proper number of delegates to Congress.” The Congress would then meet annually and elect a president.

The fourth section of the pamphlet includes Paine’s optimistic view of America’s military potential at the time of the revolution. For example, he spends pages describing how colonial shipyards, by using the large amounts of lumber available in the country, could quickly create a navy that could rival the British Royal Navy.

If there are still any doubt try reading it for yourself……

Common Sense
Thomas Paine

Table Of Contents

Try reading the document and stop depending on some political party to define what the document means……learn about the beginnings of this great nation….

AS usual I would like to make it as easy as possible to learn…so for those that are too damn lazy to read….a short video….

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