Those Military Disasters

There have been some marvelous military victories and successes…..and on the other hand there have been some major disasters that our military has participated in……

Nations often linger on their military defeats as long as, or longer than, they do on their successes. The Battle of Kosovo remains the key event of the Serbian story, and devastating military defeats adorn the national narratives of France, Russia and the American South. What are the biggest disasters in American military history, and what effect have they had on the United States?

In this article, I concentrate on specific operational and strategic decisions, leaving aside broader, grand-strategic judgments that may have led the United States into ill-considered conflicts. The United States may well have erred politically in engaging in the War of 1812, World War I, the Vietnam War and Operation Iraqi Freedom, but here I consider how specific failures worsened America’s military and strategic position.

The first disaster in this article is the Invasion of Canada…..

At the opening of the War of 1812, U.S. forces invaded Upper and Lower Canada. Americans expected a relatively easy going; the notion that Canada represented the soft underbelly of the British empire had been popular among American statesmen for some time. Civilian and military leaders alike expected a quick capitulation, forced in part by the support of the local population. But Americans overestimated their support among Canadians, overestimated their military capabilities, and underestimated British power. Instead of an easy victory, the British handed the Americans a devastating defeat.

https://nationalinterest.org/feature/the-five-biggest-disasters-american-military-history-11536

This is the five most disastrous actions according to the article’s author….

Do you have others that should be in this list?

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

John Hancock

How much do you know about American history?

Since the US Constitution is in the news almost daily….let’s look at one of the boyz of Summer that gave us the document……

For instance one of the founding fathers, John Hancock…..what do you know beyond his famous signature?

John Hancock and his signature are two of the best-known elements related to the Declaration of Independence. But how much do you know about the former president of the Continental Congress?

On May 24, 1775, Hancock was named as the presiding officer over the Second Continental Congress, which was meeting in Philadelphia to discuss the military threat posed by the British. A little more than a year later, Hancock was the first to sign the document declaring independence.

Here are 10 facts about the man whose name is now synonymous with impressive signatures.

1. Hancock was a wealthy guy. He was from Massachusetts and his family had money, which he inherited when his uncle died. In fact, Hancock may have been the richest man in New England when he inherited a shipping fortune.

2. He was a bright student. Young Hancock graduated from Harvard at the age of 17. He was also a quick learner in the business world.

3. Hancock should have been a Loyalist, but he wasn’t. With his wealth and social standing, Hancock should have been a leading member of an elite group that didn’t want independence. Instead, he sympathized with people like John and Samuel Adams, who were patriots.

4. John Hancock, smuggler? Well, he may have been an importer, too, but goods like tea that arrived in New England on Hancock’s ships may have escaped paying a duty. The suspicions led the British to seize Hancock’s ship, Liberty, which started a riot. John Adams got Hancock off the hook from the smuggling charges.

5. Hancock also had a role in the Boston Tea Party incident. While Hancock wasn’t on a ship tossing tea overboard, he was at meetings when outrage was vented at the British. He riled up the crowd with a famous statement: “Let every man do what is right in his own eyes.”

6. The British really didn’t like Hancock. The British troops that set out to Lexington and Concord in 1775 may have been hunting for Hancock and his friend, John Adams, as well as for military supplies that were stored for militia use. Hancock had to be talked out of taking the battlefield against the redcoats. And his arrest was ordered by the British after the battles.

7. Hancock was a behind-the-scenes force early in the American Revolution. Hancock raised money for the Revolution, he helped secure troops, and he played a role in getting naval forces organized. But a homesick Hancock left Congress in 1777 to return to Massachusetts.

8. He was the longtime governor of Massachusetts. Hancock was elected in 1780 to lead his state and was its governor for most of the remaining years of his life. He was immensely popular in his home state.

9. Hancock wasn’t at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Hancock had health issues by 1787 and wasn’t in the Massachusetts delegation. But he played a key role in his state’s ratification of the Constitution, when he overcame his own objections about the lack of a Bill of Rights to urge its passage.

10. What’s the deal with the signature? It’s not true that Hancock signed the Declaration in a big way to taunt the King of England. The legend goes that Hancock stated that “King George will be able to read that!” In reality, Hancock was the first to sign in a matter fitting for the president of the Congress. And only one other person was in the room when he signed it, unlike in that famous painting that shows a gaggle of patriots witnessing the event. Hancock did take a big risk: His signature was evidence of treason if things didn’t go well in the war!

They do not make Americans like that any more…..or should I say American politicians?

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Death By Suicide? Or Murder?

How about a Saturday history lesson?

I feel I have been remiss in my educating my readers on history….so much to do about very little I return to historical postings….

Time for a look into our past……yep the old professor is going to teach you a thing or two….like it or not……

How many know who Meriwether Lewis is?

Maybe you will recognize the name when paired with his partner…..William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition fame…called the Corps of Discovery.

Corps of Discovery?

 

On February 28, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson won approval from Congress for a visionary project, an endeavor that would become one of America’s greatest stories of adventure.

Twenty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to fund a small expeditionary group, whose mission was to explore the uncharted West. Jefferson called the group the Corps of Discovery. It would be led by Jefferson’s secretary, Meriwether Lewis, and Lewis’ friend,William Clark.

Over the next four years, the Corps of Discovery would travel thousands of miles, experiencing lands, rivers and peoples that no Americans ever had before.

Inside the Corps has three sections: Circa 1803, To Equip an Expedition and the Corps.

The Corps gives biographical information about the members of the Corps of Discovery, from the most famous to the virtually unknown.

To Equip an Expedition provides a partial list of the supplies Lewis and Clark brought on the expedition.

Circa 1803 puts the expedition into a historical and political context, investigating popular misconceptions of the West, as well as Jefferson’s motivations for exploring it.

You remember them right? They went from New Orleans to the Pacific Ocean in the Oregon Territory…..(later named that)……

But did you know that he was later to become Jefferson’s governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory….where he died…..

Captain Meriwether Lewis—William Clark’s expedition partner on the Corps of Discovery’s historic trek to the Pacific, Thomas Jefferson’s confidante, governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory and all-around American hero—was only 35 when he died of gunshot wounds sustained along a perilous Tennessee trail called Natchez Trace. A broken column, symbol of a life cut short, marks his grave.

But exactly what transpired at a remote inn 200 years ago this Saturday? Most historians agree that he committed suicide; others are convinced he was murdered. Now Lewis’s descendants and some scholars are campaigning to exhume his body, which is buried on national parkland not far from Hohenwald, Tenn.

 
There are too many questions about the death of Lewis…..and so little factual answers…..
 
 
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American Presidents–The Terrible

That time again…..time for a the old professor to expand your mind….and with out those drug altering drugs…..

History time again…..(I can hear the eye rolls and the heavy sighs)….as I type….according to some this admin is one of the worst in our history…..but how does it rank?

If you are a voter then you have an idea who you think was a terrible president…..most times it is along party lines…..but for the sake of argument I found a list of who they think were the “terrible” presidents…..this is along ethic and moral lines…..

Not all American presidents set a good example during their time in the White House. Your take on the most hated presidents probably depends at least a little bit on your politics. But when it comes to ethics, some presidents did things that, many Americans would agree, made them terrible people. Some committed crimes. Others took sexist, racist, or homophobic actions. Still others sanctioned unnecessary violence and brought about the deaths of thousands of people.

Democratic or Republican, numerous presidents have done things that Americans shouldn’t feel proud of. Read on to discover some of the American presidents who were actually terrible people.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/culture/american-presidents-who-were-terrible-people.html/

Please if you have someone else in mind please let us know and we can discuss your choice.

Class Dismissed!

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Corruption: Presidential Perspective

There is lots of noise these days about the Trump admin and how corrupt it has become…..but what about the other presidents that are said to have been corrupted as well?

A couple of cabinets that come to mind are Harding, Grant and Jackson…but could there be others?

Throughout American history, some presidents have had better taste than others when selecting the members of their Cabinets. The president’s Cabinet includes the vice president plus the heads of the departments of the executive branch of the government. With all those Cabinet members, sometimes not everybody has the best interests of the nation at heart.

Read on to discover which presidents appointed the most corrupt Cabinets. And get the details on how President Donald Trump’s Cabinet compares on page 7.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/culture/presidents-with-corrupt-cabinets-and-how-donald-trump-compares.html/

Along the same lines as corrupt is the fact that some of the same presidents are considered some of the most notorious in our short history…..

From Richard M Nixon, who resigned following the Watergate scandal, to the impeached Andrew Johnson, historian Adam IP Smith considers five of America’s most disreputable presidents…

https://www.historyextra.com/period/modern/the-5-most-notorious-presidents-in-us-history/

I always like to see the story of our presidents side by side……comparisons is always a good thing….helps presidents live up to the potential that the voters gave them…..unfortunately some have not lived up to their potential.

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Iran Hostage Thing 40 Years On

The date came and went and NO one seem to care…..they were too busy buying bullshit by the gallon…..how sad.

First I need to apologize…..this draft was written and saved to be posted on the day it happened…..well I screwed up….and it is posted a day late….my bad.

Do you remember where you were on 04 November 1979?

I was getting ready for work and heard the first reports on the morning news…..

On November 4, 1979, a group calling itself the Students Following the Line of the Imam stormed the gates of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, seized control of the compound, and took several dozen American diplomats, Marine guards, and others hostage. Thus began a 444-day ordeal that shocked the world, fundamentally altered the political scene in Iran, and cemented negative perceptions in the West of the country’s Islamic leadership.

Forty years later, the Iran hostage crisis is still critical to understanding the bitter nature of relations between Iran and the United States. It instantly formed a core part of the American narrative ab

out the Islamic Republic as a regime willing to flout international law and universal moral principles, a view that has colored much of U.S. policymaking ever since.

Today, the National Security Archive is posting a small sampling of declassified records that recall that pivotal episode. They include a memo from National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski to President Carter suggesting several hardline actions including replacing Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini as Iran’s leader and even overt intervention (see Document 07). Carter was not prepared to take up any of these options but they indicate the level of alarm created by events in Tehran.

https://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/iran/2019-11-04/1979-iran-hostage-crisis-recalled

This situation was the beginning of all the stuff that we read about Iran in the news…..the media needs the event and the Iranians to help the Pentagon feed a narrative…..a narrative that has allowed for a 40 year war of words……

Our other national humiliations, from the Alamo to Saigon, have faded from memory or been transformed into noble lost causes. Anger over the hostage crisis has not subsided. For four decades it has grotesquely distorted our approach to the Middle East. Although it ended peacefully with the release of American diplomats, it has had an effect on our national consciousness — and our foreign policy — comparable to the effect of the 9/11 attacks, in which nearly 3,000 people were killed.

The hostage crisis is a lamentable example of how ignorance leads nations to misunderstand each other. It led many Americans to believe that Iranians act out of pure nihilism, cheerfully violating every law of God and man without any reason other than a desire to show how much they hate us. Only years later did it become clear that the opposite was true. The hostage-takers acted to achieve a specific political goal — to stave off what they suspected was an imminent effort by the Americans to reinstall a despised Iranian leader. We might have recognized their motive if we knew our own history.

Our misunderstanding of the hostage crisis still poisons US-Iran relations

After the fall of the USSR we needed a foe to keep the dollars flowing into the Pentagon and Iran fits the bill very well….continue the anger and the money will flow.

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

Making America(n History) Great Again–Part 38

I have been posting a series written by Maj. Danny Sjursen and this is the final part of the historic perspective.

Maj. Danny has taken the reader from the very early days to the present……

For all the readers and visitors that are interested in his entire series I give you the series by Maj. Sursen…..

Part 1; Part 2; Part 3; Part 4; Part 5; Part 6; Part 7; Part 8; Part 9; Part 10; Part 11; Part 12; Part 13; Part 14; Part 15; Part 16; Part 17; Part 18; Part 19; Part 20; Part 21; Part 22; Part 23; Part 24; Part 25; Part 26; Part 27; Part 28; Part 29; Part 30; Part 31; Part 32; Part 33; Part 34; Part 35; Part 36; Part 37.

This part is the final episode and it takes into consideration the world of today…..

There is a widespread belief that American history is best viewed in a linear context. The United States, the narrative goes, began as a flawed experiment in democracy—replete with slavery and bigotry at the start—but has gradually and consistently improved into a more perfect union, a millenarian nation on its way toward serving as an example for the world, a “city on a hill.” Minorities, according to this notion, may have once been oppressed but have gained equal rights and equal protection under the law; America might have conquered Indian and Mexican land but has long since set aside its imperial ways. As such, both at home and abroad, the U.S., though still imperfect, is a force for good in the world.

Progress, such as it is, has been wildly inconsistent and halting since the Anglo colonization of the eastern coast of North America. Take the plight of African-Americans. Theirs has been a history of false starts, dreams deferred and hopes enlivened only to be dashed. Consider, for example, that more blacks were U.S. House members and senators in 1877 than in 1967. In the wake of the Civil War, the reforms of Reconstruction launched African-Americans into positions of power they would not regain for nearly a century. During this time, Northern whites abandoned them to the whims of Southern bigots, and the result was Jim Crow—systemic segregation, a parallel apartheid system in the American South. A further example is that blacks finally saw their voting rights protected by the 1965 Voting Rights Act—which required the federal government to carefully review electoral procedures in the former Confederate states—only to find many of those protections stripped away by a reactionary Supreme Court early in the 21st century. Clearly, there’s very little that is progressive or linear in the journey of black Americans.

American History for Truthdiggers: A Once, Always and Future Empire

The “Bright City on the Hill” of Reagan fame is just a slogan and an outright lie….but that matters not to most Americans….nothing about history matters to most Americans.

This is an excellent series and every person interested in American history should read and learn.

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“Lego Ergo Scribo”