Most Corrupt American Politicians

Please do not get your panties in a wad….this is history not some attempt to defame our current president.

Who are the most corrupt of American politicians?  This would be a history lesson…..that is if you believe in history…..

With the recent impeachment trial of Governor Rod Blagojevich, we thought it only fitting to take a look at politicians we found to be the most corrupt of all time. There could easily be a Top 100 most corrupt politicians list, but we chose to narrow our focus to 10.

One of the people you won’t find here is Richard Nixon. Despite his well known transgressions, Nixon didn’t line his own pockets. Defining political corruption as the use of power for personal gain, this list includes only those public servants who used their office for financial profit.

Boss Tweed

The American symbol of inner-city political corruption, William “Boss” Tweed brilliantly mastered the form of aiding his constituents and business partners in return for votes, money and power. Tweed, a Democrat, served as a member of and eventually headed New York’s Tammany Hall amidst heavy war profiteering during the Civil War. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1852, the New York City Board of Advisers four years later, and the New York State Senate in 1867.

The city’s debts jumped about $100 million dollars in just two years from 1868 to 1870. Tweed was convicted in 1873 for his role in a corruption ring that stole at least $1 billion in today’s dollars and given a 12-year sentence. Tweed was released a year later however after his prison term was reduced, though he was immediately rearrested, as the city sued him for $6 million. Tweed escaped and fled to Spain where he was arrested and sent back to New York City. Tweed died in prison from pneumonia in 1878. Many, including Tweed himself, believed that despite his crooked ways he did a lot of good for the city, especially for the poor.

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/lists/most_corrupt_politicians/

Not to fear…there is another chapter to this sage waiting to be written.

Your education is complete for the session……

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Who Was The 6th President Of The United States?

Time for your history lesson…..stuff your teacher did not teach you…..

What do you know about the 6th president? Save your anxiety…..John Quincy Adams.

The first President who was the son of a President, John Quincy Adams in many respects paralleled the career as well as the temperament and viewpoints of his illustrious father. Born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1767, he watched the Battle of Bunker Hill from the top of Penn’s Hill above the family farm. As secretary to his father in Europe, he became an accomplished linguist and assiduous diarist.

After graduating from Harvard College, he became a lawyer. At age 26 he was appointed Minister to the Netherlands, then promoted to the Berlin Legation. In 1802 he was elected to the United States Senate. Six years later President Madison appointed him Minister to Russia.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/john-quincy-adams/

That was general info that some will already know….then let’s look deeper…..

Why does it matter what Adams said and did 200 years ago? Because the common misunderstanding of his role contributes to a larger misunderstanding of what U.S. foreign policy has been in the past and should be in the future. Advocates of a sharply curtailed foreign policy often contend that they are simply calling for a reversion to the time-tested American tradition of non-intervention and limited engagement with the world. They argue that Adams is representative of a more realistic statecraft that has been lost amid America’s alleged obsession with projecting its influence and values beyond its borders.

Uncovering the actual legacy of John Quincy Adams might make one think differently.

Restraint and the ‘Actual Legacy’ of John Quincy Adams

To rehash the things that Adams did in his life…..

#1 He served as U.S. Ambassador to several nations

In his mid-twenties, John Quincy Adams wrote a series of articles supporting President George Washington’s policy of keeping U.S. out of the hostilities in Europe which resulted due the French Revolution. In 1793, at the age of 26, Adams was appointed the United States Ambassador to the Netherlands by Washington. Three years later, Washington appointed him Minister to Portugal, and in the year after that, he was appointed Minister to Prussia by President John Adams, his father. In 1809, President James Madison appointed him as the first ever U.S. Ambassador to Russia, and in 1815, he was appointed Minister to Great Britain.

10 Major Accomplishments of John Quincy Adams

Now you know all about a little studied president of the United States…..

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“lego ergo scribo”

They Would Be President

As we start the 2020 election….I thought a historical look into the past might amuse my readers….

When taking history in school we are all taught about those men that were elected as president of the United States……but who were the “also ran”…..or should I say “close but no cigar”?

An interesting question as we wind down to the presidential election for 2020…..and I can throw a little history in there as well…..(life is good)…..

We begin the lesson with Daniel Webster…..

1. Daniel Webster

Webster is a terribly important figure in American history. Secretary of State twice, Webster has been called one of the greatest Senators. He never achieved his ultimate ambition, the presidency, but ironically he turned down two opportunities which would have granted his wish.
In 1840, Webster was offered the vice presidential spot on the Whig ticket, but declined. He had sought the nomination himself, but lost it to William Henry Harrison, who offered him the Secretary of State position. Harrison is famous for having died thirty days after his inauguration, catapulting “His Accidency”, Vice President John Tyler, to the White House. Had Webster accepted Harrison’s offer, he would have been the 10th president, not Tyler.
Webster continued as Secretary of State, negotiating a final and lasting treaty with Britain, but eventually left the Cabinet and returned to the Senate. He sought the Whig nomination for President again in 1848 but was again defeated by a military hero, Zachary Taylor. Taylor, like Harrison before him, offered Webster the Vice Presidency. Webster clearly didn’t think his response through, and had not learned from the past. He turned Taylor down, saying “I do not propose to be buried until I am really dead and in my coffin.” Webster missed out on the presidency again, when Taylor died in 1850 of what was probably gastroenteritis. Instead, Millard Fillmore ascended to office, though he did appoint Webster as Secretary of State again.

The presidency was always Webster’s goal, and he might have achieved it had he been a little less stubborn and ornery. As for what he might have done in office, we can take some inspiration from his achievements in the rest of his public life. Webster was a prominent conservative and determined to preserve the Union as tensions over slavery began to boil. He supported the Compromise of 1850 which did just that, at least for a while. He also advocated, and may have worked towards, stronger relations with Japan. Webster is famed now as a character in a story and play, The Devil and Daniel Webster in which he defends a farmer who sells his soul to the devil, a testament to his famous oratory. If he had been president, his oratory might not have been enough to help him avoid the pitfalls of the office at a very turbulent time.

Read on……https://historyexplosion.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/no-cigar-ten-men-who-narrowly-missed-out-on-the-u-s-presidency/

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“lego ergo scribo”

Those Military Disasters

There have been some marvelous military victories and successes…..and on the other hand there have been some major disasters that our military has participated in……

Nations often linger on their military defeats as long as, or longer than, they do on their successes. The Battle of Kosovo remains the key event of the Serbian story, and devastating military defeats adorn the national narratives of France, Russia and the American South. What are the biggest disasters in American military history, and what effect have they had on the United States?

In this article, I concentrate on specific operational and strategic decisions, leaving aside broader, grand-strategic judgments that may have led the United States into ill-considered conflicts. The United States may well have erred politically in engaging in the War of 1812, World War I, the Vietnam War and Operation Iraqi Freedom, but here I consider how specific failures worsened America’s military and strategic position.

The first disaster in this article is the Invasion of Canada…..

At the opening of the War of 1812, U.S. forces invaded Upper and Lower Canada. Americans expected a relatively easy going; the notion that Canada represented the soft underbelly of the British empire had been popular among American statesmen for some time. Civilian and military leaders alike expected a quick capitulation, forced in part by the support of the local population. But Americans overestimated their support among Canadians, overestimated their military capabilities, and underestimated British power. Instead of an easy victory, the British handed the Americans a devastating defeat.

https://nationalinterest.org/feature/the-five-biggest-disasters-american-military-history-11536

This is the five most disastrous actions according to the article’s author….

Do you have others that should be in this list?

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John Hancock

How much do you know about American history?

Since the US Constitution is in the news almost daily….let’s look at one of the boyz of Summer that gave us the document……

For instance one of the founding fathers, John Hancock…..what do you know beyond his famous signature?

John Hancock and his signature are two of the best-known elements related to the Declaration of Independence. But how much do you know about the former president of the Continental Congress?

On May 24, 1775, Hancock was named as the presiding officer over the Second Continental Congress, which was meeting in Philadelphia to discuss the military threat posed by the British. A little more than a year later, Hancock was the first to sign the document declaring independence.

Here are 10 facts about the man whose name is now synonymous with impressive signatures.

1. Hancock was a wealthy guy. He was from Massachusetts and his family had money, which he inherited when his uncle died. In fact, Hancock may have been the richest man in New England when he inherited a shipping fortune.

2. He was a bright student. Young Hancock graduated from Harvard at the age of 17. He was also a quick learner in the business world.

3. Hancock should have been a Loyalist, but he wasn’t. With his wealth and social standing, Hancock should have been a leading member of an elite group that didn’t want independence. Instead, he sympathized with people like John and Samuel Adams, who were patriots.

4. John Hancock, smuggler? Well, he may have been an importer, too, but goods like tea that arrived in New England on Hancock’s ships may have escaped paying a duty. The suspicions led the British to seize Hancock’s ship, Liberty, which started a riot. John Adams got Hancock off the hook from the smuggling charges.

5. Hancock also had a role in the Boston Tea Party incident. While Hancock wasn’t on a ship tossing tea overboard, he was at meetings when outrage was vented at the British. He riled up the crowd with a famous statement: “Let every man do what is right in his own eyes.”

6. The British really didn’t like Hancock. The British troops that set out to Lexington and Concord in 1775 may have been hunting for Hancock and his friend, John Adams, as well as for military supplies that were stored for militia use. Hancock had to be talked out of taking the battlefield against the redcoats. And his arrest was ordered by the British after the battles.

7. Hancock was a behind-the-scenes force early in the American Revolution. Hancock raised money for the Revolution, he helped secure troops, and he played a role in getting naval forces organized. But a homesick Hancock left Congress in 1777 to return to Massachusetts.

8. He was the longtime governor of Massachusetts. Hancock was elected in 1780 to lead his state and was its governor for most of the remaining years of his life. He was immensely popular in his home state.

9. Hancock wasn’t at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Hancock had health issues by 1787 and wasn’t in the Massachusetts delegation. But he played a key role in his state’s ratification of the Constitution, when he overcame his own objections about the lack of a Bill of Rights to urge its passage.

10. What’s the deal with the signature? It’s not true that Hancock signed the Declaration in a big way to taunt the King of England. The legend goes that Hancock stated that “King George will be able to read that!” In reality, Hancock was the first to sign in a matter fitting for the president of the Congress. And only one other person was in the room when he signed it, unlike in that famous painting that shows a gaggle of patriots witnessing the event. Hancock did take a big risk: His signature was evidence of treason if things didn’t go well in the war!

They do not make Americans like that any more…..or should I say American politicians?

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Death By Suicide? Or Murder?

How about a Saturday history lesson?

I feel I have been remiss in my educating my readers on history….so much to do about very little I return to historical postings….

Time for a look into our past……yep the old professor is going to teach you a thing or two….like it or not……

How many know who Meriwether Lewis is?

Maybe you will recognize the name when paired with his partner…..William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition fame…called the Corps of Discovery.

Corps of Discovery?

 

On February 28, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson won approval from Congress for a visionary project, an endeavor that would become one of America’s greatest stories of adventure.

Twenty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to fund a small expeditionary group, whose mission was to explore the uncharted West. Jefferson called the group the Corps of Discovery. It would be led by Jefferson’s secretary, Meriwether Lewis, and Lewis’ friend,William Clark.

Over the next four years, the Corps of Discovery would travel thousands of miles, experiencing lands, rivers and peoples that no Americans ever had before.

Inside the Corps has three sections: Circa 1803, To Equip an Expedition and the Corps.

The Corps gives biographical information about the members of the Corps of Discovery, from the most famous to the virtually unknown.

To Equip an Expedition provides a partial list of the supplies Lewis and Clark brought on the expedition.

Circa 1803 puts the expedition into a historical and political context, investigating popular misconceptions of the West, as well as Jefferson’s motivations for exploring it.

You remember them right? They went from New Orleans to the Pacific Ocean in the Oregon Territory…..(later named that)……

But did you know that he was later to become Jefferson’s governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory….where he died…..

Captain Meriwether Lewis—William Clark’s expedition partner on the Corps of Discovery’s historic trek to the Pacific, Thomas Jefferson’s confidante, governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory and all-around American hero—was only 35 when he died of gunshot wounds sustained along a perilous Tennessee trail called Natchez Trace. A broken column, symbol of a life cut short, marks his grave.

But exactly what transpired at a remote inn 200 years ago this Saturday? Most historians agree that he committed suicide; others are convinced he was murdered. Now Lewis’s descendants and some scholars are campaigning to exhume his body, which is buried on national parkland not far from Hohenwald, Tenn.

 
There are too many questions about the death of Lewis…..and so little factual answers…..
 
 
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American Presidents–The Terrible

That time again…..time for a the old professor to expand your mind….and with out those drug altering drugs…..

History time again…..(I can hear the eye rolls and the heavy sighs)….as I type….according to some this admin is one of the worst in our history…..but how does it rank?

If you are a voter then you have an idea who you think was a terrible president…..most times it is along party lines…..but for the sake of argument I found a list of who they think were the “terrible” presidents…..this is along ethic and moral lines…..

Not all American presidents set a good example during their time in the White House. Your take on the most hated presidents probably depends at least a little bit on your politics. But when it comes to ethics, some presidents did things that, many Americans would agree, made them terrible people. Some committed crimes. Others took sexist, racist, or homophobic actions. Still others sanctioned unnecessary violence and brought about the deaths of thousands of people.

Democratic or Republican, numerous presidents have done things that Americans shouldn’t feel proud of. Read on to discover some of the American presidents who were actually terrible people.

https://www.cheatsheet.com/culture/american-presidents-who-were-terrible-people.html/

Please if you have someone else in mind please let us know and we can discuss your choice.

Class Dismissed!

I Read, I Wrote, You Know

“Lego Ergo Scribo”