Stop Showing Those Videos

I am writing this in opposition to an op-ed…..

Allissa Richardson writing for Vox stating that we need to stop showing the videos of killings of black/brown people by the police……

Allissa Richardson once thought videos showing police brutality would bring justice. Proving to everyone what people of color encounter with police would bring change. Richardson has changed her mind, she writes in an essay on Vox, after repeatedly seeing George Floyd die on television. The practice invites a victim’s last moments to be broken down by the public and a jury, then preserved online for viewing anytime, often without the family’s consent. Now she wonders why it ever seemed necessary to document the killings. “Why were Black and brown people forced to pre-litigate their own murder trials in this way?” she writes. “Why was it necessary to form a counternarrative to the old stereotype of Black and brown folks’ criminality? Why did we ever need to produce a parallel storyline to an official police report?”

The practice only reinforces white supremacy, Richardson writes, reminding everyone of the protections police officers are afforded and the fate of people of color who object to this social order. She calls for suspending the airing of the videos online and on TV unless the family agrees they can be shown. That could prompt journalists to look into the systemic issues leading to the deaths instead of the exact second when a 13-year-old about to be killed dropped a gun. If we believe people of color, we can eliminate the “need to play this game of video empathy before justice,” says Richardson, who teaches journalism at USC. “We have enough proof,” she writes. “We have enough pain. What we don’t have is reform.” You can read the full piece here.

As I stated in the beginning…..I disagree with the premise…..

I do not think that the outcome would have been the same without the video.

I will agree that the MSM does have a tendency to beat the viewer about the head with them…..and until there is more accountability for the violence and death committed by the police the videos are needed.

I would love your thoughts.

Turn The Page!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–12Apr21

We are living in the age of TMI…..like these days we have minute by minute updates on Covid and a trial and now the death of a prince……we do NOT need this much information.

As the world says good-bye to Prince Phillip…..I have read many thoughts on his life……I am sure that he lived a good life considering he was part of the pampered royals.

I am sorry that he has passed on….but I still do not see why this is a major news story here in the US. Yes he was a force on the world stage only because he was married to the queen.

Even in the UK and the coverage of his death has gotten a bunch of complaints…..

The UK’s national broadcaster switched instantly into mourning mode when Prince Philip’s death was announced Friday. The BBC canceled its regular programming and aired special coverage hosted by black-clad news anchors throughout the day. Popular prime-time shows such as the cooking contest MasterChef were supplanted. Some Britons saw the BBC’s actions as a fitting mark of respect. For others, it was a bit much. The broadcaster received so many complaints alleging its reporting was excessive that it set up a special website page for viewers to register objections if they felt there was “too much TV coverage of the death of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.” The AP reports it didn’t disclose how many people had complained by Saturday.

The publicly funded BBC often finds itself under fire from all sides for its treatment of major national events. When the Queen Mother Elizabeth died in 2002, the broadcaster received criticism because the announcer who delivered the news did not wear a black tie. Britain’s other TV stations also gave extensive coverage to Philip’s death, but the BBC is under unique pressure because it is taxpayer-funded. Scrutiny and questions about its role have grown in recent years as commercial rivals and streaming services give audiences more choice. BBC Director-General Tim Davie has acknowledged the organization must evolve with changing times, but says it remains essential to British society. “We have a different purpose” than broadcasters such as Netflix, Davie told UK lawmakers last month. “I’m not running a business for profit. I’m running … an organization for purpose.”

I am sorry that the queen has lost her mate of 73 years…..but here in the US it should not be the major suction on the news cycle….it will be endless.

I apologize if this offends but our country is going to Hell and yet we are ‘treated’ to hour after hour of the mundane .

Turn The Page!

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–18Mar21

By now most everyone in this country has heard or read about the horrific shooting in Atlanta…..8 people dead 6 Asian-Americans……and good for the police the bastard has been arrested…..

The 21-year-old man accused of killing eight people Tuesday at three Atlanta-area massage parlors, most of them women of Asian descent, claims racism wasn’t the motive, police say. Cherokee County Sheriff Frank Reynolds says Robert Aaron Long indicated he has issues, “potentially sexual addiction,” and “may have frequented some of these places in the past,” NPR reports. He says Long denied there was any racial motive involved. Capt. Jay Baker of the sheriff’s office says Long, who was arrested after a manhunt Tuesday night, saw the spas as “a temptation for him that he wanted to eliminate.” More:

  • He may have planned more attacks. Long was taken into custody around 150 miles south of Atlanta after police tracked his vehicle on the interstate. Police say he was on his way to Florida to attack “some type of porn industry,” the AP reports.
  • The timeline. Police believe Long bought the gun hours before the killings, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Investigators say the killing spree began at Youngs Asian Massage Parlor in Acworth in Cherokee County around 5pm. Three women and one man were shot dead at that location. An hour later, police in Atlanta found three women shot dead at Gold Spa. Another woman had been killed across the street at Aromatherapy Spa. Long was taken into custody around 8:30pm.
  • The victims. Police say six victims were of Asian descent and two, including the only man, were white, the New York Times reports. A Hispanic man was injured. The South Korean consulate in Atlanta says four of the victims were ethnic Koreans. The victims of the first shooting were identified Wednesday as Delaina Ashley Yaun, 33; Paul Andre Michels, 54; Xiaojie Yan, 49; and Daoyou Feng, 44.
  • Long’s family helped investigators. CNN reports that Long’s family contacted police after authorities shared a photo of a suspect from the scene of the first shooting. His relatives “are very distraught, and they were very helpful in this apprehension,” Reynolds says.
  • Mayor: “It has to stop.” Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms says the shootings were a tragedy whether investigators determine it to be a hate crime or not. “Whatever the motivation was for this guy, we know that the majority of the victims were Asian,” she said. “We also know that this is an issue that is happening across the country. It is unacceptable, it is hateful and it has to stop.” Georgia state Rep. Bee Nguyen said the shootings appeared to be at the “intersection of gender-based violence, misogyny, and xenophobia.”
  • “People in the Asian American community are scared.” Georgia state Sen. Michelle Au says that while she won’t jump to conclusions about the motive for Tuesday’s killing spree, “people in the Asian American community are scared” amid increasing violence and discrimination, the Washington Post reports. “It is taking place in a landscape where Asian Americans are increasingly terrified and fearful for their lives and their safety because of these escalating threats against our people,” she said.
  • Celebrities speak out. USA Today rounds up some of the reactions from celebrities. George Takei called the killings a “hate crime” and said Republican leaders should “stop fanning violence with anti-Asian rhetoric.” Daniel Dae Kim tweeted: “The race of the person committing the crime matters less than the simple fact that if you act with hate in your heart, you are part of the problem.”
  • Obama calls for new gun laws. “Even as we’ve battled the pandemic, we’ve continued to neglect the longer-lasting epidemic of gun violence in America,” the former president tweeted Wednesday. “Yesterday’s shootings are another tragic reminder that we have far more work to do to put in place commonsense gun safety laws and root out the pervasive patterns of hatred and violence in our society.”
  • Deadliest in years. The attack marks the sixth mass killing of 2021 in the US and is the deadliest since 9 people were killed in Dayton, Ohio, in August 2019, according to a database compiled by the AP, USA Today and Northeastern University.

Sex addiction?

Sounds like a page out of Tiger Woods playbook.

This dickwad is trying to find an excuse for his actions….or trying to set up a “diminshed capacity” defense.

(Sorry to be flippant here)  Like Son of Sam who took his prompts from his dog…this d/bag apparently wants us to believe that he took his prompts from is wanker.

Screw him!

Watch This Blog!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

R.I.P. In 2020

WE know of all the “famous” people that died in 2020 like country singer Charlie Pride and RBG and Eddie Van Halen among others but there were others that were equally important and this post is just my way of acknowledging their passing….

Elizabeth Wurtzel, 52. Her blunt and painful confessions of her struggles with addiction and depression in the bestselling Prozac Nation made her a voice and a target for an anxious generation. Jan. 7. Sultan Qaboos bin Said, 79. He was the Mideast’s longest-ruling monarch who seized power in Oman in a 1970 palace coup and pulled his Arabian sultanate into modernity while carefully balancing diplomatic ties between adversaries Iran and the US. Jan. 11. Thomas Railsback, 87. An Illinois Republican congressman who helped draw up articles of impeachment against President Nixon in 1974. Jan. 20. Bernard Ebbers, 78. The former chief of WorldCom who was convicted in one of the largest corporate accounting scandals in U.S. history. Feb. 2. Charles “Chuckie” O’Brien, 86. A longtime associate of Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa who became a leading suspect in the labor leader’s disappearance and later was portrayed in the Martin Scorsese film, The Irishman. Feb. 13. Sy Sperling, 78. The Hair Club for Men founder who was famous for the TV commercials where he proclaimed “I’m not only the Hair Club president but I’m also a client.” Feb. 19. Thich Quang Do, 91. A Buddhist monk who became the public face of religious dissent in Vietnam while the Communist government kept him in prison or under house arrest for more than 20 years. Feb. 22.

Max von Sydow, 90. The actor known to art house audiences through his work with Swedish director Ingmar Bergman and later to moviegoers everywhere when he played the priest in the horror classic The Exorcist. March 8. Rev. Darius L. Swann, 95. His challenge to the notion of segregated public schools helped spark the use of busing to integrate schools across the country. March 8. Tom Dempsey, 73. The NFL kicker born without toes on his kicking foot who made a then-record 63-yard field goal. April 4. Earl Graves Sr., 85. He championed Black businesses as the founder of the first African American-owned magazine focusing on Black entrepreneurs. April 6. Herbert Stempel, 93. A fall guy and whistleblower of early television whose confession to deliberately losing on a 1950s quiz show helped drive a national scandal and join his name in history to winning contestant Charles Van Doren. April 7. Linda Tripp, 70. Her secretly taped conversations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky provided evidence of an affair with President Bill Clinton that led to his impeachment. April 8. Phyllis Lyon, 95. A gay rights pioneer who, with her longtime partner, was among the first same-sex couples to marry in California when it became legal to do so in 2008. April 9.
Astrid Kirchherr, 81. She was the German photographer who shot some of the earliest and most striking images of the Beatles and helped shape their trend-setting visual style. May 12.

Ken Osmond, 76. On TV’s Leave It to Beaver, he played two-faced teenage scoundrel Eddie Haskell, a role so memorable it left him typecast and led to a second career as a police officer. May 18. Christo, 84. He was known for massive, ephemeral public arts projects that often involved wrapping large structures in fabric. May 31. Shigeru Yokota, 87. A Japanese campaigner for the return of his daughter and more than a dozen others who were abducted to North Korea in the 1970s. June 5. Bonnie Pointer, 69. She convinced three of her church-singing siblings to form the Pointer Sisters, which would become one of the biggest acts of the 1970s and ’80s. June 8. Charles Webb, 81. A lifelong nonconformist whose debut novel The Graduate was a deadpan satire of his college education and wealthy background adapted into the classic film of the same name. June 16. Milton Glaser, 91. The groundbreaking graphic designer who adorned Bob Dylan’s silhouette with psychedelic hair and summed up the feelings for his home state with “I (HEART) NY.” June 26. Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr., 82. He was the last of three one-time Ku Klux Klansmen convicted in a 1963 Alabama church bombing that killed four Black girls and was the deadliest single attack of the civil rights movement. June 26.

Mary Kay Letourneau, 58. A teacher who married her former sixth-grade student after she was convicted of raping him in a case that drew international headlines. July 6. Joanna Cole, 75. The author whose Magic School Bus books transported millions of young people on extraordinary and educational adventures. July 12. Connie Culp, 57. She was the recipient of the first partial face transplant in the US. July 29. Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, 83. A prolific Jewish scholar who spent 45 years compiling a monumental and ground-breaking translation of the Talmud. Aug. 7. Gail Sheehy, 83. A journalist, commentator and pop sociologist whose best-selling Passages helped millions navigate their lives from early adulthood to middle age and beyond. Aug. 24. Lady Yvonne Sursock Cochrane, 98. One of Lebanon’s most prominent philanthropists and a pioneer defender of the country’s heritage. Aug. 31. Injuries suffered from a massive explosion in Beirut.

Kaing Guek Eav, 77. Known as Duc, he was the Khmer Rouge’s chief jailer, who admitted overseeing the torture and killings of as many as 16,000 Cambodians while running the regime’s most notorious prison. Sept. 2. Winston Groom, 77. The writer whose novel Forrest Gump was made into a six-Oscar winning 1994 movie that became a soaring pop culture phenomenon. Sept. 17. Rev. Robert Graetz, 92. The only white minister to support the Montgomery bus boycott and who became the target of scorn and bombings for doing so. Sept. 20. Ang Rita, 72. A veteran Nepalese Sherpa guide who was the first person to climb Mount Everest 10 times. Sept. 21. Timothy Ray Brown, 54. He made history as “the Berlin patient,” the first person known to be cured of HIV infection. Sept. 29. Bernard S. Cohen, 86. He won a landmark case that led to the Supreme Court’s rejection of laws forbidding interracial marriage and later went on to a successful political career as a state legislator. Oct. 12. Christopher Pendergast, 71. A suburban New York teacher who turned a Lou Gehrig’s disease diagnosis into a decades-long campaign to raise awareness and fund research. Oct. 14. James Randi, 92. A magician who later challenged spoon benders, mind readers and faith healers with such voracity that he became regarded as the country’s foremost skeptic. Oct. 20.

Diane di Prima, 86. A poet, activist and teacher who was one of the last surviving members of the Beats and one of the few women writers in the Beat movement. Oct. 25. David Dinkins, 93. He broke barriers as New York City’s first African American mayor but was doomed to a single term by a soaring murder rate, stubborn unemployment and his mishandling of a riot in Brooklyn. Nov. 23. Dave Prowse, 85. The British weightlifter-turned-actor who was the body, though not the voice, of archvillain Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy. Nov. 28. Rafer Johnson, 86. He won the decathlon at the 1960 Rome Olympics and helped subdue Robert F. Kennedy’s assassin in 1968. Dec. 2. Charles “Chuck” Yeager, 97. The World War II fighter pilot ace and quintessential test pilot who in 1947 became the first person to fly faster than sound. Dec. 7.

So many…..

May their families and friends find the peace of mind that they need.

May they all Rest In Peace

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Dead Before He had His Chance

A tragic death for a soon to be representative before he was sworn in from his station in the government……the representative-elect from Louisiana…..

Luke Letlow, Louisiana’s incoming Republican member of the US House, died Tuesday night from complications related to COVID-19 only days before he would have been sworn into office, the AP reports. He was 41. Letlow spokesman Andrew Bautsch confirmed the congressman-elect’s death at Ochsner-LSU Health Shreveport. “The family appreciates the numerous prayers and support over the past days but asks for privacy during this difficult and unexpected time,” Bautsch said in a statement. “A statement from the family along with funeral arrangements will be announced at a later time.” Louisiana’s eight-member congressional delegation called Letlow’s death devastating, and US House leaders were also offering their condolences. Letlow is survived by his wife, Julia Barnhill Letlow, and two children, Jeremiah and Jacqueline.

The state’s newest congressman, set to take office in January, was admitted to a Monroe hospital on Dec. 19 after testing positive for the coronavirus. He was later transferred to the Shreveport facility and placed in intensive care. Dr. GE Ghali of LSU Health Shreveport told the Advocate that Letlow didn’t have any underlying health conditions that would have placed him at greater risk from COVID-19. Letlow, from the small town of Start in Richland Parish, was elected in a December runoff election for the sprawling 5th District US House seat representing central and northeastern regions of the state, including the cities of Monroe and Alexandria. He was to fill the seat being vacated by his boss, Republican Ralph Abraham. Letlow had been Abraham’s chief of staff and ran with Abraham’s backing for the job.

My first thought was if he is a GOPer was he one that flaunted the calls for social distancing and masks?

The reports are that he had mixed use of masks….could that have led to his death?

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Charley Pride–R.I.P.

And his name can be added o those already dead from Covid…

His name is Charley Pride…..

Charley Pride, country music’s first Black star whose rich baritone on such hits as “Kiss an Angel Good Morning” helped sell millions of records and made him the first Black member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, has died. He was 86, the AP reports. Pride died Saturday in Dallas of complications from COVID-19, according to a public relations rep. “I’m so heartbroken that one of my dearest and oldest friends, Charley Pride, has passed away,” Dolly Parton tweeted. “It’s even worse to know that he passed away from COVID-19.” Pride released dozens of albums and sold more than 25 million records during a career that began in the mid-1960s. Hits besides “Kiss an Angel Good Morning” in 1971 included “Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone,” “Burgers and Fries,” and “Mountain of Love.”

He had three Grammy Awards, more than 30 No. 1 hits between 1969 and 1984, won the Country Music Association’s Top Male Vocalist and Entertainer of the Year awards in 1972, and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2000. Until the early 1990s, when Cleve Francis came along, Pride was the only Black country singer signed to a major label. In 1993, he joined the Grand Ole Opry cast in Nashville. “They used to ask me how it feels to be the ‘first colored country singer,'” he told the Dallas Morning News in 1992. “This country is so race-conscious, so ate-up with colors and pigments. I call it ‘skin hangups’—it’s a disease.” In 2008 while accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award in Mississippi, Pride said he never focused on race.

Us old farts that use to enjoy country music will remember his name……most social media addicts may not…..that is why I give you one of his many hits…..

I offer his family and friends my condolences…..may he forever Rest In Peace…..

Sorry for the sad note to end my Sunday postings…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–11Dec20

This post should have been made yesterday but I got side-tracked with life…..I apologize.

On 10 December 1967—the day the music died.

One of my favorite musicians died in that plane crash…..Otis Redding.

His song “Dock Of The Bay” was a standard for us in Vietnam…..and to this day I get goose bumps when I hear him sing…..especially that song.

The song is a classic and should NEVER be re-recorded. PERIOD!

On December 10, 1967, a plane carrying Otis Redding and other members of his band, The Bar-Kays, plunged into Lake Monona.

They were on their way to a show, when their twin-engine aircraft crashed in the lake, miles from the airport. Redding, 26, a soul singer and songwriter, along with six others, died in the crash.

https://madison.com/gallery/news/archives/photos-from-history-redding-plane-crashes-in-lake-monona/collection_55f50468-1b64-11ea-95e6-9b97aa9fe109.html#1

Learn more about the Voice of Soul……

https://www.biography.com/musician/otis-redding

In his memory I would like to present his song that I still cannot get enough of…..and the memories flood back into my psyche.

May he Rest In Peace….we miss you.

Be Well….Be Safe….

Weird Historic Deaths

Most of my regulars know that I do like me some history and I try to find cool and interesting stuff to help my readers learn about our distant past.

Deaths!

We know about Julius Caesar and Spartan kings and Socrates….among others.

These deaths are pretty straight forward….assassination, poison, combat….but there are also deaths that can be explained as…well….weird.

There is never an easy time to be alive. The New York Times claims that, in 3,400 years of recorded history, humanity has only been at peace for a grand total of 268 years, or eight percent of the time. And as world diplomacy becomes increasingly complex and national interests rub up against one another, it doesn’t seem like we’ll be adding to that total anytime soon.

But perhaps it’s fair to say that some periods of time are more unpredictable, or rather that societies were so ungovernable that very strange things could occur. This is true especially of the ancient world, when democracy was experimental and science was equal parts observation, interpretation, and superstition, a way of looking at the world that was both searching and naive.

From domestic life to war, from private passions to public performance, the lives of ancient people have suddenly ended in the most unexpected ways. That’s not say that each of the ancients in this article should be receiving a long-overdue Darwin Award, but their deaths constitute such overwhelming weirdness that their stories have been transmitted down the millennia. There’s an element of timelessness to them, and once you read about them, you won’t be able to get them out of your head.

Draco–Death By Applause

https://www.grunge.com/244727/the-weirdest-deaths-from-ancient-history/

Strange deaths…..stuff that is not taught in your typical history class….and that is why the Old Professor is here……to teach the stuff others ignore.

Be Smart!

Learn Stuff!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Jail, The Killing Fields

The election is over and time to return to looking and posting on society and the problems that need attention.

We have been bombarded with the tragic deaths of people that are being taken into custody by the people……the protests are justified….the violence, in my opinion, is justified by the protesters for those sent to “control” protests are showing NO mercy to the people or their rights.

However there is a part of this story that goes virtually under reported…..deaths will accused are in jail awaiting trial……nearly 5000 deaths in a decade of accused dying in jail for various reasons….

7,571 inmate deaths Reuters documented in an unprecedented examination of mortality in more than 500 U.S. jails from 2008 to 2019. Death rates have soared in those lockups, rising 35% over the decade ending last year. Casualties like Hill are typical: held on minor charges and dying without ever getting their day in court. At least two-thirds of the dead inmates identified by Reuters, 4,998 people, were never convicted of the charges on which they were being held.

Unlike state and federal prisons, which hold people convicted of serious crimes, jails are locally run lockups meant to detain people awaiting arraignment or trial, or those serving short sentences. The toll of jail inmates who die without a case resolution subverts a fundamental tenet of the U.S. criminal justice system: innocent until proven guilty.

The Reuters analysis revealed a confluence of factors that can turn short jail stays into death sentences. Many jails are not subject to any enforceable standards for their operation or the healthcare they provide. They typically get little if any oversight. And bail requirements trap poorer inmates in pre-trial detention for long periods. Meanwhile, inmate populations have grown sicker, more damaged by mental illness and plagued by addictions.

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-jails-deaths/

This is unacceptable….but do I need quote the Constitution? 

Damn silly question!

Of course I do!

The U.S. Constitution grants inmates core rights, but those provisions are hard to enforce. The Fourteenth Amendment guarantees fair treatment to pre-trial detainees, but “fair” is open to interpretation by judges and juries. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel punishment forbids “deliberate indifference to serious medical needs of prisoners,” but proving deliberate negligence is difficult. The Sixth Amendment assures speedy trials, but does not define speedy.

Don’t trust me…then I suggest you look it the fuck up!

Here is one proposal…..

End pretrial detention for most defendants

Problem: Many people who face criminal charges are unnecessarily detained before trial. Often the sole criteria for release is access to money for bail. This puts pressure on defendants to accept plea bargains, even when they are innocent, since even a few days in jail can destabilize their lives: they can lose their apartment, job, and even custody of children. Pretrial detention also leads to jail overcrowding, which means more dangerous conditions for people in jail, and also drives sheriffs’ demands for more and bigger jails — wasting taxpayer dollars on more unnecessary incarceration.

Solutions: States are addressing this problem with a variety of approaches, including bail reforms that end or severely restrict the use of money bail, establishing the presumption of pretrial release for all cases with conditions only when necessary, and offering pretrial services such as postcard or phone reminders to appear in court, transportation and childcare assistance for court appearances, and referrals to drug treatment, mental health services, and other needed social services.

Any thoughts?

Learn Stuff!

I Read I Write You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Say Good-Bye to James Bond

Sad news…..I am a huge James Bond fan…..and was thrilled when they brought Ian Fleming’s books to the big screen…..now my favorite James Bond has died…..Sean Connery.

He was the first actor, and many say the best, to portray James Bond in the spy film series. Now, a goodbye to the original 007: The family of Sir Sean Connery says the Scottish actor has died at the age of 90, reports the BBC. Connery kicked off his role as a British MI6 agent in 1962’s Dr. No, based on the books by author Ian Fleming, and went on to star in seven of the franchise’s films. He was also known for his wide span of other movie roles, including The Hunt for Red October, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, The Rock, and 1987’s The Untouchables, for which he won a best supporting actor Oscar for his role as Irish cop Jimmy Malone.

Born Thomas Sean Connery in Edinburgh, Connery grew up poor and first toiled as an unskilled laborer, until he joined the Royal Navy at age 17, per Variety. He left a few years later due to health issues and worked various jobs before he started entering bodybuilding contests; he even placed third in an early-50s Mr. Universe competition. His trajectory changed when he moved to London and heard about a part in South Pacific: He took a crash course in singing and dancing and surprisingly got the part. He worked for various repertory companies in and near London for several years before his first Bond role. Connery was formally knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2000, earning him the right to use “Sir” in front of his name. Connery is survived by his wife of 40-plus years, Micheline Roquebrune, as well as son Jason Connery and a grandson.

I realize that Sean Connery was a masterful actor….but for me he brought a fiction hero to life and he will always be the best James Bond in my book…all the others were just pale imitations.

He was missed when the actor change came and he will be missed now.

May he Rest In Peace.

Please share your thoughts as well.

“lego ergo scribo”