Is It Riot Or Resistance?

American society has been once again awaken from the Dream by protests……and as normal it is because a black person has been killed by the police.

I am sure there are a wealth of opinions on why and most of them are out of the mouths of white people who have no idea on what it is truly all about.

So is it riot or resistance?

Let’s be honest…..your opinion will be formed by what you see and hear in the news….so basically the MSM decides which it will be….

The general public’s opinions about protests and the social movements behind them are formed in large part by what they read or see in the media. This gives journalists a lot of power when it comes to driving the narrative of a demonstration.

They can emphasize the disruption protests cause or echo the dog whistles of politicians that label protesters as “thugs.” But they can also remind the public that at the heart of the protests is the unjust killing of another black person. This would take the emphasis away from the destruction of the protests and toward the issues of police impunity and the effects of racism in its many forms.

https://theconversation.com/riot-or-resistance-how-media-frames-unrest-in-minneapolis-will-shape-publics-view-of-protest-139713

Now after about 2 weeks of violence the moralizing has begun….

The moralizing has begun.

Those who have rarely been the target of organized police gangsterism are once again lecturing those who have about how best to respond to it.

Be peaceful, they implore, as protesters rise up in Minneapolis and across the country in response to the killing of George Floyd. This, coming from the same people who melted down when Colin Kaepernick took a knee — a decidedly peaceful type of protest. Because apparently, when white folks say, “protest peacefully,” we mean “stop protesting.”

Everything is fine, nothing to see here.

Protest, Uprisings, and Race War

Some are asking…”But why all the violence?”

Vox took a look at that question in an article over the weekend….

Of course the protests are about George Floyd’s death. Political leaders fear violence at the protests — and any destruction of property or bodily harm is, of course, worrisome — but their concerns actually demonstrate the fundamental asymmetry that the protesters are pushing back against. The state has a monopoly on legitimate violence, and it is often directed at young black people like George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice — the list goes on. When they die, the police officers responsible too frequently face no repercussions because they are protected by the law. If the men who killed George Floyd go to prison for their actions, they will be exceptions that prove that longstanding rule.

Yet if the anger and frustration from centuries of racial oppression causes a peaceful protest to become “violent” — and most of the reported attacks have been directed against property, not people, though one man was tragically killed in Detroit — suddenly that other kind of violence becomes the dominant story so far as political leaders are concerned, a disruption to the natural order that must be corrected. The systemic racism that has led to so many black lives being cut short becomes secondary.

But it shouldn’t, because that’s the real problem America must grapple with. Otherwise, sooner or later, this will all happen again.

https://www.vox.com/2020/5/30/21275507/minneapolis-george-floyd-protests-police-violence

The most logical next question was how did the police get authorized the use of these choke holds?

Ever hear of the City of Los Angeles v Lyons?

We can lay some of the blame at the feet of SCOTUS.

Lyons brought a federal lawsuit against the city and officers who assaulted him. But that case, City of Los Angeles v. Lyons (1983), did not end well for him. Decades later, the 5-4 decision still stands as one of the greatest obstacles to civil rights lawyers challenging police brutality in cases like George Floyd’s.

Adolph Lyons was not the only man choked by a Los Angeles police officer. Between 1975 and 1980, LAPD officers used chokeholds on at least 975 occasions.

As Justice Thurgood Marshall wrote in his dissenting opinion, “the city instructs its officers that use of a chokehold does not constitute deadly force.” Nevertheless, “no less than 16 persons have died following the use of a chokehold by an LAPD police officer,” 12 of whom were black men.

https://www.vox.com/2020/5/30/21274697/supreme-court-police-chokehold-george-floyd-derek-chauvin-lyons-los-angeles

This whole ball of hate has been building since the video of the beating of Rodney King was posted for all to see…..and the results of the results of the police trials of the ones doing the beating.

But to worry our “president” has a plan to end these protest…..

President Trump, declaring himself a “president of law and order,” threatened Monday to deploy “thousands and thousands of heavily armed soldiers, military personnel and law enforcement officers” to American cities, claiming governors and local officials had “failed to take necessary action” to end civil unrest.

https://www.latimes.com/politics/story/2020-06-01/trump-tells-governors-to-dominate-as-he-shrinks-from-crisis

Just a last thought from CNBC…..American police forces killed three people per day in 2019, for a total of nearly 1,100 killings

Learn Stuff!

Be Careful…..Be Safe……

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

4 thoughts on “Is It Riot Or Resistance?

  1. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    As a fact … “American police forces killed three people per day in 2019, for a total of nearly 1,100 killings.” … so what say you? Riots or resistance?

  2. I like to see people standing up for what is right, and taking to the streets to voice their protests. But looting televisions and sneakers from shops before setting fire to them is not protesting. It is theft and arson, pure and simple. And it undoes so much of the good being done by those resisting.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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