More Plague History

I know that these times….days locked away in our separation……my thoughts are that while learning stuff about the way to be deal with this pandemic why not learn as well…..and history is always fascinating….that maybe just me.

I posted about the plagues of old and how they fit into the gravity of history………https://lobotero.com/2020/03/28/pandemics-in-history/

That post looked t the Middle Ages in Europe…..but they were not the only region to suffer……

Among the worst infections recorded is the plague which is fairly well documented in the West starting with the Plague of Justinian (541-542 CE) and continuing on through the Black Death (1347-1352 CE). Outbreaks of plague following the Black Death already had a body of literature to draw upon and so, in the West, are also well documented.

The same cannot be said for the plagues of the Near East which claimed millions of lives between 562-1486 CE throughout the regions now known as Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt among others. The initial plague is thought to have been a continuation of Justinian’s Plague, although other theories as to origin have been suggested, and the epidemics which followed are considered either a resurgence of this plague or another strain brought to the region through trade or the return of troops from campaign. These outbreaks are sporadically mentioned in histories of the plague owing to a number of factors including:

https://www.ancient.eu/article/1532/plagues-of-the-near-east-562-1486-ce/

Another thought…….How did the Greeks handle the outbreaks of disease in days past……

ith the spread of the coronavirus, the world is becoming pointedly aware of the extent to which human beings are interconnected. The rapid spread of the virus has highlighted how much we are dependent upon one another, not just for basic biological needs, but also for our sense of belonging and even commerce.

There’s nothing novel about this level of interdependence.

As historians of early Christianity, we know that from the sixth century B.C., people in the ancient Greek city-state, or polis, were acutely conscious of this dependence. They dealt with disease spread as a result of living in close quarters.

http://theconversation.com/ancient-greeks-purged-city-states-of-disease-as-they-would-a-human-body-and-it-was-the-most-vulnerable-that-suffered-133670

In other words…..shelter in place or separation has been a good plan for at least 2500 years.

More on the responses in history to a pandemic (plague)……

Throughout history, epidemics and pandemics of plague and other diseases have caused widespread panic and social disorder even, in some instances, when the people of one region were aware of a pervasive infection elsewhere. In the case of the Plague of Justinian (541-542 CE and after), for example, the people of Constantinople were aware of plague in the Near East for at least two years before it arrived in the city but made no provision because they did not consider it their problem.

Once the disease struck, the people felt overwhelmed as it seems as though they believed that what had happened to others elsewhere could not possibly happen to them. Since there was no concept of germ theory, no one understood the cause of these outbreaks or how they spread and so they were attributed to supernatural causes and the wrath of the gods or God.

https://www.ancient.eu/article/1534/reactions-to-plague-in-the-ancient–medieval-world/

Be clam…..avoid crowds….wash hands often….stay prepared……

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“lego ergo scribo”

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