Closing Thought–18Jul19

WE have just celebrated the Declaration of Independence which help set this nation on the road to freedom from Mother England.

The most important document of this era was the publishing of Common Sense by Thomas Paine….if one reads the document they will notice much that much of it was is also in the DoI……check it out here….

Common Sense is a political pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775-76 and published anonymously on January 10, 1776, during the beginning of the American Revolution.  Common Sense advocated that the thirteen original colonies (which later became the United States) gain independence from Great Britain. In his pamphlet, Paine makes a passionate case for independence by focusing on moral and political arguments. For almost three months, Paine managed to maintain his anonymity and did not become officially connected with the independence controversy until March 30, 1776.

In the first section of Common Sense, Paine makes a distinction between society and government, arguing that government is a “necessary evil.” As society continues to evolve, Paine feels that a government becomes necessary in order to prevent the natural evil  in humankind, and accordingly, he sees the need for laws. He explains that order must be  promoted in a civil society. Further, laws must take into consideration the impossibility of all people in a society meeting centrally to make laws. Therefore representation and elections become necessary. This model is intended to mirror the situation of the colonists at the time of publication and Paine references the Constitution of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. However, Paine identifies two tyrannies in the British constitution—monarchical and aristocratic tyranny, where those in power rule by heredity and contribute nothing to the people. He clearly detests this.

In the second section, Paine evaluates monarchy.  He begins by arguing that all men are equal at the time of creation and, therefore, the distinction between kings and subjects (as in England) is an inherently false distinction. Paine then examines some of the problems that kings and monarchies have caused in the past and concludes the following: “In England a king hath little more to do than to make war and give away places; which in plain terms, is to impoverish the nation and set it together by the ears.  A pretty business indeed for a man to be allowed eight hundred thousand sterling a year for, and worshipped into the bargain! Of more worth is one honest man to society and in the sight of God, than all the crowned ruffians that ever lived.”

In the third section, Paine examines hostilities between England and the American colonies and argues that the best course of action would be independence for the colonists. Paine proposes a Continental Charter that he states “should come from some intermediate body between the Congress and the people.” This Continental Charter should outline a new national government, which Paine argues should take the form of a Congress. Paine suggests that a Congress might be created in the following way: each colony could be divided in districts and each district would “send a proper number of delegates to Congress.” The Congress would then meet annually and elect a president.

The fourth section of the pamphlet includes Paine’s optimistic view of America’s military potential at the time of the revolution. For example, he spends pages describing how colonial shipyards, by using the large amounts of lumber available in the country, could quickly create a navy that could rival the British Royal Navy.

If there are still any doubt try reading it for yourself……

Common Sense
Thomas Paine

Table Of Contents

Try reading the document and stop depending on some political party to define what the document means……learn about the beginnings of this great nation….

AS usual I would like to make it as easy as possible to learn…so for those that are too damn lazy to read….a short video….

Be Smart!

Learn Stuff!

“Lego Ergo Scribo”

“Cognito Ergo Scribo”

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5 thoughts on “Closing Thought–18Jul19

  1. Too bad they did not follow Paine’s idea about how to elect the chief executive. They should have listened to him and if necessary had their war then instead of putting it off for eight or so years.

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