1950’s–What Happened To Peace In Korea?

A war ends with a ceasefire and there is no further attempts to bring about a lasting peace…..after 60+ years why is that?

Most recently Our Dear Leader help a “summit” with the leader of North Korea, Kim…..and after this meeting we were promised that the Korean Peninsula would be nuke free soon…..

But let’s step back in time shall we…..the the 1950’s we and our allies fought a war on the Korean Peninsula and after a couple of bloody years a ceasefire was signed and the hostilities halted….a ceasefire but why no peace pact?

Yep a history question so that I can flex my historical muscle…..try it it is fun…….

In the long history of Korea, nothing compares to the 20th century division of the peninsula or the war that followed. That war has not finished, and a peace treaty remains elusive. China, North Korea and South Korea all seek a peace treaty, but 11 U.S. presidents since 1953 have been unwilling to agree.

If President Trump turns out to be the exception, that shift could help put an end to more than a half-century of conflict — and the role of the United States in determining whether peace arrives is not a small one. Neither is it coincidental: in fact, the U.S. has played a key role in keeping the conflict going as long as it has.

http://time.com/5360343/korean-war-american-history/

What is the reason that the US needed this conflict to continue?  Of course it is all about the Military-Industrial Complex……greed is a prime motivator.

In closing the Nuke News…….

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has issued its latest report on North Korea’s nuclear program, with its usual language expressing “grave concern” about any ongoing nuclear developments which might be active.

These reports on North Korea are a lot less specific than the IAEA reports one would be used to seeing on Iran, which is awash in IAEA inspectors since the nuclear deal. The IAEA has not a single inspector in North Korea, meaning everything in the report is based on second-hand reports and allegations.

Which means the IAEA report is in great measure just a reiteration of media reports we’ve already seen, with the conclusion that they haven’t seen any indication North Korea has stopped all nuclear activity. With no inspectors, they don’t really know, however.

The watchdog says that North Korea’s nuclear power plant is believed to still be running. It likely is since there’s never been report of a shutdown. The other speculations about activity are based heavily on media reports of what’s been seen in satellite images, and what third parties have guessed those may imply.

(antiwar.com)

Is there a de-nuke deal or not?  We were told that there was a deal and that denuclearization would commence…..I know it is early in the process but so far nothing seems to be progressing as we were told.

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5 thoughts on “1950’s–What Happened To Peace In Korea?

  1. A peace deal would mean recognising that there were two countries. The North never wanted that, and the western allies liked the need to have to keep troops stationed there. I can’t see a long-term peace deal being acceptable to either side, in all honest.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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