Does Anyone Remember The War Of 1812?

This war seems to fall through the cracks even though it made Andrew Jackson famous and by extension president.

Where I live we remember that war because the last battle was fought less than 50 miles away and we like our history and besides it was about the only thing that ever happened in Chalmette.

(Battlefield Memorial)

(Actual Battlefield)

This article was written in 2012 for the 200th anniversary of the war.

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, a fact that may elude all but the most committed enthusiasts of America’s more obscure wars. Don’t expect coverage to compete with or even register alongside the steady drumbeat that has accompanied the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. It’s hard to imagine a flurry of 1812 books flying off the shelves, or the New York Times commissioning a blog series about the conflict. Like Avogadro’s number or the rules of subjunctive verbs, the War of 1812 is one of those things that you learned about in school and promptly forgot without major consequence.

There are plenty of reasons for this. The War of 1812 has complicated origins, a confusing course, an inconclusive outcome, and demands at least a cursory understanding of Canadian geography. Moreover, it stands as the highlight of perhaps the single most ignored period of American History—one that the great historian Richard Hofstadter described as “dreary and unproductive … an age of slack and derivative culture, of fumbling and small-minded statecraft, terrible parochial wrangling, climaxed by a ludicrous and unnecessary war.”

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/history/2012/05/war_of_1812_bicentennial_why_does_no_one_remember_the_war_that_made_andrew_jackson_famous_.html

Actually the hero of the Battle Of New Orleans was Jean Lafitte…not so much Jackson…

Lafitte’s image changed from pirate to patriot during the War of 1812. Britain and the United States declared war in June 1812, but until 1814, most of the fighting took place on the east coast or northern border of the United States. In September 1814, British military officials sought Lafitte’s help in their campaign to attack the U.S. from the Gulf of Mexico. Lafitte decided to warn American authorities and offered to help defend New Orleans in exchange for a pardon for his men. His warnings were not believed at first and the U.S. Army and Navy went ahead with a planned attack on Lafitte’s base at Grand Terre.

https://www.nps.gov/people/jeanlafitte.htm

I have always been interested in Early American history…period 1750-1820…it is a time when so much happened and so little interest.  This battle was interesting since it was the last battle fought in the War of 1812 plus when it was fought the war was already over.

If you are ever in the region stop by and visit…..it is a small battlefield and will not take up much of your valuable time.

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7 thoughts on “Does Anyone Remember The War Of 1812?

  1. My first memory of this war was a popular song of the time, a big hit in the UK for Lonnie Donegan.
    in 1959, and a US hit for Johnny Horton, the same year. I was 7 years old then, and looked up the war in a history book, after hearing the song.

    Well in 1814, we took a little trip
    Along with Colonel Packenham down the mighty Mississipp’
    We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
    And we fought the bloomin British in the town of New Orleans

    Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a comin’
    There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began a running
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexicoooo, yeh

    Weeell, we looked down the river till we see the British come
    There must have been a hundred of ’em beatin’ on the drum
    They stepped so high and they made the bugles ring
    Well, we stood beside our cotton bales and never sayed a thing

    Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a comin’
    And there wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began a running
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
    Ederum a ohderum a ederum a ohderum

    Well, Packenham said we could take em by surprise
    If we didn’t fire a musket till we looked ’em in the eyes
    Well, we stood quite still till we see their faces well
    Then we opened up our muskets and we really gave em…

    Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a comin’
    And there wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
    And we fired once more and they began a running
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Weeeeell, they rrraan through the briars and they ran through the brambles
    And they ran through the bushes where the rabbits couldn’t go
    They ran so fast that the hounds couldn’t catch em
    All down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a comin’
    There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began a running
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexicooooh ah ha tiddly dee

    Well, we fired our muskets so the barrels melted down
    Then grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
    Well, we stuffed his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind
    So when we touched the powder off, the ‘gator lost his mind

    Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a comin’
    There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
    We fired once more and they began a running
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
    Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
    Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
    Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
    On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

    Best wishes, Pete.

    1. War started June 1812. Ironically Napoleon defeated at Waterloo June 1815 which although not date of peace treaty is date for war issues no longer existing. correct to War started June 18, 1812

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