“Repeal And Replace”–A Slower Pace

With all the chanting during the campaigns of 2016…the one that so many want to happen over night is the “repeal and replace” of Obamacare (ACA)…..ever notice those that chant the loudest are the ones that do not need or use it?

Obamacare is hated by many….but The ACA is so  misunderstood that few know what it is……

Ask some if they want ObamaCare repealed and they’ll say yes, but ask those same people if they want the Affordable Care Act repealed and they may have a different answer. That despite the two being one and the same, the New York Times reports, a fact that apparently a “sizable minority” of people don’t realize, per a new survey by Morning Consult. Around 17% of those who participated in the poll said they believed ObamaCare and the ACA were two different health-care entities, while another 18% just weren’t sure.

Younger people (ages 18 to 29) seemed to have the most head-scratching over this, as did those making less than $50,000 a year—both groups that could be hit hard by a repeal, the Times notes. This “apparent confusion,” per Fortune, also extended into what people believed would happen if the ACA were indeed repealed, with 29% thinking incorrectly that Medicaid coverage and private insurance subsidies would remain untouched, while another 24% admitted they didn’t know.

Typical in an age of misinformation and lies……

There is a growing problem with the promise…..not as easy as anyone thought it would be……a good slogan but not so good in action…..

How goes President Trump’s plan to immediately repeal and replace ObamaCare? It seems to be getting gummed up in the realities of DC politics. Trump himself acknowledged Sunday in an interview on Fox News that things might stretch into 2018. “It’s very complicated,” he said. “I would like to say by the end of the year at least the rudiments, but we should have something within the year and the following year.” Related coverage:

  • In a story about the delays, the New York Times notes the shift among some GOP lawmakers from “replace” to “repair,” and points out that lawmakers are facing angry crowds of people worried about losing coverage at town hall meetings—”the mirror image of 2009, when Tea Party activists assailed Democrats who supported the law.”
  • With this shift toward “repair,” the Wall Street Journal reports on growing friction from conservative Republicans in the House worried about losing momentum. The 40 members of the Freedom Caucus are agitating to push ahead with immediate repeal, which they see as the necessary first step.
  • The Journal story has this quote from Heritage Foundation exec Dan Holler: “House action is sort of imperative to get this kick-started and going. I think the longer this drags on, the more people are starting to understand the chance of a repeal is slipping away. Certainly it’s becoming harder and harder with each passing day.”
  • But more important than timing are the tough decisions Republicans must make on substance, writes Jennifer Rubin at the Washington Post. Among them: “If they are determined to get rid of the individual mandate, are they willing to defend near-universal ‘access’ instead of near-universal coverage?” Full column here.
  • House Speaker Paul Ryan promises progress, though he avoids a time frame in this update of what’s happening on Capitol Hill.
  • Supporters of the Affordable Care Act should avoid gloating, cautions an analysis at CNN. Remember that Trump already signed an executive order aimed at undercutting the law, and while Congress may seem to be softening on going further, the repair vs. replace shift may be mere semantics. “The risks to the program are very real in the coming months,” writes Julian Zelizer. “Rather than listening to what Republicans are saying, Democrats would be better served to watch what they are actually doing.” Full column here.

Such is life in DC…broken promises and wasted talk…..

Advertisements

5 thoughts on ““Repeal And Replace”–A Slower Pace

  1. Living in a country where we pay into a good health service makes us acutely aware of the problems that brings with public funding, but also how lucky we are to receive treatment that far exceeds our contribution in most cases. A basic system of heath care should be the right of all, and repealing any programme that helps your country along this path is a retrograde step that will have serious long-term repercussions for anyone who is not a top-earner, or receives health care as part of a salary package.

    Once again, it seems to me that the people most in need of this provision are the very same ones who voted to bring in Trump, and end it. A classic case of self-destruction based on spite?

    Best wishes, Pete.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s