Trying To Reason With The Hurricane Season

This post probably means little to those that do not have to deal with the possibility of a hurricane….but down here we take all news very seriously.

As the weekend begins we here on the Gulf Coast are preparing for the beginning of another hurricane season…..and the news is not all that good.

A recordkeeping change has altered expectations for the number of tropical storms in an Atlantic hurricane season. The average number of named tropical storms in a year is now 14, up from an average of 12 before the change, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. The numbers are based on a 30-year period, NPR reports, and the agency shifted to a new time frame on Friday, effective this season—1991 to 2020 instead of 1981 to 2010. The average for hurricanes is seven, up from six. The average number of Category 3, 4 or 5 hurricanes stays at three, per Axios. The agency made no adjustments for the Pacific Ocean. “These updated averages better reflect our collective experience of the past 10 years, which included some very active hurricane seasons,” said a forecaster for the agency.

At the same time, with average temperatures rising in the US and precipitation becoming more erratic in places, the agency is adjusting what’s considered normal weather. As of next month, NOAA will use the higher temperature baseline of the past 30 years to reflect “normal.” Climate change hasn’t been shown to affect the total number of storms, but hotter water near the ocean surface can bring hurricanes that are more powerful. That’s been the case in the Gulf of Mexico lately. “NOAA scientists have evaluated the impacts of climate change on tropical cyclones,” the forecaster said, “and determined that it can influence storm intensity.” Storms also are being spotted sooner because of improved technology. On Friday, President Biden proposed a $1.4 billion increase in the agency’s budget, up from the current $6.9 billion

Last year we had Hurricane Zeta…100 mph winds….lots of damage…..after Katrina in 2005 we do not need anymore storms to damage this region.

I will update the prediction as the season gets closer…..

As my tradition I close with Jimmy Buffet…..

Be well….be safe….

The Mississippi Aquarium

My final post on this Saturday….is one of congrats to the new Mississippi Aquarium that open September 2020 on the day that Katrina destroyed the Coast.

Gulfport’s very own Mississippi Aquarium has reeled in one very prestigious recognition.

It looks like they’re big fish now as they ranked number four by USA Today as one of the top ten in the category ‘Best New Attraction.’

They were selected by a poll with people from all over the country voting. The aquarium is thrilled to receive this award, especially considering they’ve only been open since September 1st.

While the fish, alligators, and birds probably had something to do with it, the aquarium says they’re really thankful for the people. Mississippi Aquarium President and CEO Kurt Allen said, “Our community support in Gulfport and the state has been tremendous. We have over 6,000 members already supporting us in our mission. Everything we’ve done is built on education, conservation, and community. So, we’re always trying to foster a relationship in those three areas. Everything has been really, really positive so far.”

(wxxv.com)

I offer my congrats for a job well done.

But there is a problem……

Us mere peasants cannot afford to visit the attraction…..it cost $30 dollars per visit….no discounts for locals that would generate more income in my opinion.

Other than that it is a marvelous attraction for our visitors.

Have a good day…..be well….be safe….

“lego ergo scribo”

Hurricane Zeta

Closing Thought–27Oct20

On this day in history….1809 Pres. Madison orders the annexation of my region known as West Florida in those days we had just rebelled and set up the Republic of West Florida…….https://lobotero.com/2012/09/22/the-republic-of-west-florida/

Your history lesson complete….we shall move on……

Here we go again!

MY region is in line for yet another storm….this time it will be Hurricane Zeta…..the word is that the temps are too cool for this storm to gain too power force so we will be in line for some strong wind and rain…..nothing we cannot deal with…..

Yet again, the Gulf Coast is bracing as another hurricane roars toward it. Zeta, the 27th named storm of the 2020 season, was upgraded to a hurricane Monday, NBC News reports. It made landfall on the Caribbean coast of Mexico’s eastern Yucatan Peninsula late Monday, the AP reports. It’s expected to become the 11th named storm to make landfall in the US this season, potentially around Wednesday afternoon in Louisiana, which would be a record for the country. Heavy rains are expected to start in the area, including Mississippi and Alabama, Tuesday night. It’s possible Zeta could be downgraded back to a tropical storm before it reaches the US, but even that is bad news for Louisiana, which is still recovering from hurricanes Laura and Delta

All this storm stuff is getting damn redundant this hurricane season…..most of us will be damn glad to see the 2020 season come to an end…..and be put in the history books.

 

This is just a reminder that if things get hot then I may be off-line for awhile until service can be restored…..and I shall continue posting until the power runs out…..

AS usual I want to leave my readers with a tune from Jimmy Buffet…..

Be well my friends.

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–15Sep20

Here comes Sally!

I apologize for the slack posts today but I must take time to make sure the house and property are secure…..

Usually the first thing to go is the internet…then the power…..so I try to get as much done on IST as I can before the fall.

The forecast is that the eye should come ashore between Biloxi and Destin…..Biloxi is about 10 miles East of my house…..so if true we will get rain and wind…..the forecast is about 8 inches of rain.

The one saving grace here is that as I write this post the storm seems to be weakening a bit…..but that is before landfall….so lots can happen between then and now….

I am far enough off the beach to avoid any storm surge….local flooding will be a problem.

If I disappear off WP for awhile it is because the storm has kicked our butts….but not to worry….I will return as soon as I can.

Be well….Be safe…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Killer Katrina

15 years ago today Hurricane Katrina roared ashore killing and destruction of all in its path…..My father and I rode the storm out in our house since he refused to leave his house I had no choice but to stay with him since he was in a wheelchair and make sure he was alright.

The storm lasted 13 hours and 43 minutes….you cannot imagine how long that felt.

August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States. When the storm made landfall, it had a Category 3 rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale–it brought sustained winds of 100–140 miles per hour–and stretched some 400 miles across.

https://www.history.com/topics/natural-disasters-and-environment/hurricane-katrina

Here are a few things that most people that were not effected by the storm know…..

Hurricane Katrina was the largest and 3rd strongest hurricane ever recorded to make landfall in the US.

In New Orleans, the levees were designed for Category 3, but Katrina peaked at a Category 5 hurricane, with winds up to 175 mph.

The final death toll was at 1,836, primarily from Louisiana (1,577) and Mississippi (238). More than half of these victims were senior citizens. Keep seniors safe and sound, and help them plan for hurricane season.

The storm surge from Katrina was 20-ft (six meters) high.

705 people are reported as still missing as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

Hurricane Katrina affected over 15 million people in different ways varying from having to evacuate their homes, rising gas prices, and the economy suffering.

An estimated 80% of New Orleans was under water, up to 20 ft deep in places.

Hurricane Katrina caused $81 billion in property damages, but it is estimated that the total economic impact in Louisiana and Mississippi may exceed $150 billion, earning the title of costliest hurricane ever in US history

Hurricane Katrina impacted about 90,000 square miles.

The region affected by the storm supported roughly 1 million non-farm jobs, and still, hundreds of thousands of local residents were left unemployed by the hurricane.

More than 70 countries pledged monetary donations or other assistance after the hurricane. Kuwait made the largest single pledge of $500 million, but Qatar, India, China, Pakistan and Bangladesh made very large donations as well.

My family has ridden out two of the most powerful storms in history…..Camille and Katrina…..for those too young to remember 1969….may I help you out?

August 17 in 1969, Hurricane Camille made landfall along the Mississippi Gulf Coast near Waveland, MS. Camille is one of only FOUR Category 5 hurricanes ever to make landfall in the continental United States (Atlantic Basin)

Camille ranks as the 2nd most intense hurricane to strike the continental US with 900 mb pressure and landfall intensity of 150 knots. Camille ranks just below the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane with 892 mb and 160 knots, while slightly stronger than Hurricane Andrew with 922 mb and 145 knots and Hurricane Michael with 919 mb and 140 knots. The actual maximum sustained winds of Hurricane Camille are not known as the hurricane destroyed all the wind-recording instruments in the landfall area. Re-analysis data found peak winds of 150 knots (roughly 175 mph) along the coast. A devastating storm tide of 24.6 feet occurred west of our area in Pass Christian, MS.

https://www.weather.gov/mob/camille

And now we have dodged a bullet this time…..but there is always another storm eyeing the Mississippi Gulf Coast…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–03Jul20

News from the Deep Deep South–Mississippi.

The Mississippi virus report…..

New Cases and Deaths as of July 1

New Cases

870

New COVID-19 positive test results reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. yesterday.

New Deaths

10

New COVID-19 related deaths reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. yesterday.

Mississippi’s totals……

  Confirmed Probable Total
Cases 28,573 197 28,770
Deaths 1,074 18 1,092

I was not a supporter of Tate Reeves when he ran for governor…but I will admit that he has done an excellent job handling the pandemic……he has put the opening up of Mississippi on 01Jul20 on hold….for now….

With coronavirus cases in Mississippi on the rise, Governor Tate Reeves announces a pause in the re-opening process.

Governor Tate Reeves took to Facebook yesterday to announce the state will not be ready to fully reopen.

“The plan had been to fully reopen by July 1st. That’s not happening. Our re-opening is paused and we’re considering what we need to do going forward. That was not an easy call,” Governor Tate Reeves said.

He went on to say that things are getting worse, not better.

(deltanews.tv)

Mississippi gets lots of revenue from the operations of casinos in the state……Even the money grubbing casinos have issued their demand that masks be worn….

You may listen to the news here…..https://m.magnoliastatelive.com/2020/07/02/mississippi-gamblers-told-to-mask-up-in-casinos-starting-friday-night/

Mississippi also made the news recently by abandoning the rebel flag as the state symbol…..and Reeves signed the law…..

But I want my readers to see how racism is ingrained into the media here…..

We’ve been hearing about racism much more frequently the past several weeks, but it’s not because racism just appeared. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Racism is sewn into the fabric of America and it doesn’t always look like overt racism. In fact, it doesn’t even always look like the microaggressions that we feel or see on a daily basis. The language we use is filled with racism that we don’t even realize or see. I like to call this “sneaky racism.” It’s sneaky because it is spoon fed to every American from birth through death, and if you aren’t made aware so you can look for it, it will pass right by you, creating what’s known as implicit bias.

https://www.upworthy.com/implicit-racial-bias-in-the-media

Any Thoughts?

As this holiday begins please…..be well and be safe…..and above all enjoy your time off and smile…..

“lego ergo scribo”

The Saharan Dust

First….I take MoMo for her walk at 5 am because it is a bit cooler…that is until this morning…..at 5 am it was 90 degrees with 85% humidity….just a flippin’ joy. (sarcasm)

Now onto the Big News for the Coast……

This weekend the massive dust cloud that originated from the Sahara should make it to our neck of the world….the problem is we may not get much spectacular sights for it is forecast to be overcast for most of the week.

So I will post photos if I get a chance….until then how about some facts about this “cloud”……

Expansive dust clouds arise from the sun-baked Sahara each year, making the 5,000-mile journey across the Atlantic Ocean to the southern United States. While these dust plumes tend to stay intact while traveling across the ocean, they typically diffuse by the time they hit the Caribbean. But this year, things are different.

This month’s dust cloud is more resilient than usual—its dust is so opaque and thick that it can be clearly seen from the International Space Station, while its predecessors have been ghostly and faint from space. Astronaut Doug Hurley photographed the cloud from the ISS on June 21, tweeting, “We flew over this Saharan dust plume today in the west central Atlantic. Amazing how large an area it covers!”

These dust plumes, called the Saharan Air Layer (or SAL) are born when severe wind storms strike the Sahara. Entering the Atlantic Ocean at the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the plumes catch on to the trade winds, which run east-west along the equator.

The dust is already covering Caribbean skies, and Gulf Coast states like Texas and Louisiana should expect to confront this vast cloud on Wednesday and Thursday. Before the cloud enters the US here’s what you should know about the plumes.

https://www.popsci.com/story/environment/sahara-dust-plume/

That is all I have for this Sunday….hopefully you learned a bit and were entertained…..come Monday it is back to the news in the spotlight…..

Be Well…..Be Safe…..

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

 

Closing Thought–23Jun20

Summer is here for sure…this morning at 0500 hrs it was 85 with 81% humidity…..a joy to experience.(sarcasm in case you missed it)

When I was working in North Africa I experienced a couple of sand storms……plus the dust that the storms kicked up in the Sahara…..but I never thought that the dust from these storms would effect me here on the Gulf Coast…..and I was mistaken…..

Gulf Coast residents, get ready for brilliant sunsets—and a few possible health hazards. A massive dust cloud is heading west across the Atlantic and could affect the lives of people from Florida to Texas, AccuWeather reports. “According to scientists … this is an abnormally large dust cloud,” says senior AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski, who adds that the dust “started coming off the coast of Africa several days ago, in fact maybe over a week ago. And it’s still coming. It’s almost like a prolonged area of dust.” Expected to hit the Gulf Coast between Tuesday and Thursday, the Saharan dust should bring hazy and brownish skies during the day.

But the Washington Post predicts sunsets that “appear markedly more vibrant, with deeper, more expansive brushstrokes of orange and yellow washing across the sky.” On the downside, the dust could mix with other particles (like smoke, ozone, or more dust) and negatively affect anyone with sensitive lungs. The dusty air might also curb storm development, preventing tropical storms or hurricanes from forming—but the dust will likely be long gone when hurricane season reaches full force in August and September. For the record, Saharan dust is nothing new in the Gulf Coast this time of year. But by all accounts, this one’s a biggy. You can follow its movement at NASA.

Hurricane season is expected to take a pause over the next week as a large plume of dust from the Saharan Desert in Africa moves across the Atlantic Ocean. Waves of dust off the African continent are common during the summer, as the trade winds blow west from the desert into the Atlantic. However, this wave is very large and very strong. It is expected to travel westward into the Caribbean by this weekend. Then next week part of the Gulf Coast, including Mississippi, may see this plume of dust arrive.

Saharan Dust from Africa forecast to arrive in Mississippi

I am hoping to get some sunset shots but so far it has been cloudy and overcast…..but I shall continue to try.

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Trying To Season With The Hurricane Season–2020

Closing Though–01Jun20

Every year on 01 June, the start of the hurricane season I post info that will help others understand what and why we along Hurricane Alley look at religiously…..and the scary or worrisome thing is there have already been 2 named storms before the season begins.

Let me say here that hurricane preparedness has taught us living in Hurricane Alley how to deal with the pandemic…..we know prep.

Onto the new season…..

Looks like hurricanes have been changed……and not for the better…..

Are hurricanes getting worse? That’s what climate models have long predicted, and now there’s evidence: A new study finds that hurricanes have indeed grown more powerful in recent decades, LiveScience reports. “The trend is there and it is real,” lead study author James Kossin tells the New York Times. “There’s this remarkable building of this body of evidence that we’re making these storms more deleterious.” Worldwide satellite images between 1979 and 2017 show a roughly 15% increase in hurricanes hitting 100 knots, especially in the last 19 years of the time frame, per the study. The chance of a hurricane being Category 3 or worse has also risen about 8% every 10 years.

This echoes the notion that warmer water, which fuels hurricanes, is making them bigger and stronger. But greenhouse gases may not be the only cause. Scientists also point to changing sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic, perhaps due to natural variability or lower sulfur emissions in fossil-fuel burning. That said, Kossin mostly agrees with the climate-change angle: “Global warming has made hurricanes stronger, but our results don’t tell us precisely how much of the trends are caused by human activities and how much may be just natural variability,” he says in a press release.

Without further distractions…..

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is predicted to be more active than usual, according to an outlook released Thursday by The Weather Company, an IBM Business.

The outlook created by Dr. Todd Crawford, chief meteorologist at The Weather Company, calls for 18 named storms, nine hurricanes and four major hurricanes – one that is Category 3 or higher (115-plus-mph winds) on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

This forecast is significantly above the 30-year (1981-2010) normalized average of 13 named storms, seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

A little historical perspective……https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2020-04-15-atlantic-hurricane-season-april-outlook-the-weather-company-ibm

In this year of the pandemic there is more to worry about than a few storms along the Gulf Coast…..with the pandemic and then a major storm on top of the virus we could be looking at stuff for the movies……

Pete Gaynor, who runs the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is drafting a document whose title sounds like the stuff of horror movies: “COVID-19 Pandemic Operational Guidance for the 2020 Hurricane Season.”

Driving the news: “We’re doing a lot of things that are not necessarily in any playbook that has existed,” Gaynor told me in an interview on Saturday. “In some cases, we write the playbook as we go.”

https://www.axios.com/fema-coronavirus-hurricane-season-ef660cda-f4b3-4002-b8ac-71438c8edebd.html

The local news reporting on the possible change in hurricane protocols during the pandemic….

The Red Cross and Mississippi Emergency Managament Agency are working together to tackle a huge problem: How do they staff and operate shelters in a post-COVID-19 world? With an active hurricane season being projected, the agencies are working fast to find solutions.

County emergency management agencies and MEMA determine when shelters in Mississippi open. However, it is the Red Cross that staffs the shelters and provides supplies, but COVID-19 could threaten the status quo.

“That’s the kink in it, is that, if a hurricane hit right now, we would not staff any shelters due to the COVID crisis,” said Executive Director John McFarland of the Red Cross’ Southeast Mississippi chapter. “If we were to open the shelter and put people in there and provide sufficient spacing, which would obviously mean putting fewer people in, one person shows symptoms and you have to quarantine the whole shelter and you just make matters worse.”

https://www.wdam.com/2020/05/27/hurricane-protocols-could-be-changing-post-covid-world/

As with the tradition of IST I would like to ring in the 2020 Hurricane Season with Jimmy Buffet…..

One final note….if I am out of touch for awhile then a storm took out our internet and please bear with me….I shall return as soon as I can.

What did the hurricane say to the coconut palm?

Hang on to your nuts for this is no ordinary blow job.

Please add this pdf to your preparedness…..

Click to access 39779_MEMA-Hurrican-Preparedness.pdf

Be well….Be safe…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Virus–Local News

Not often do I post on the doings in my region……but during this time of crisis because of Covid-19 I think that a little local news could help people understand what would be coming for their neighborhood.

My state, Mississippi, now has the highest rate of hospitalizations due to Covid-19…….

Mississippi currently has the highest COVID-19 hospitalization rate in the nation, at 31 percent, according to states’ health department data gathered by The COVID Tracking Project

Based on numbers the state health department released Wednesday, 333 patients have been hospitalized so far and 22 people have died. Since the state started regularly updating hospitalization rates, Mississippi has consistently remained among the top three states of about 40 states consistently reporting hospitalization data. As of Wednesday, Oklahoma and South Carolina rank just behind Mississippi, at 30 and 27 percent, respectively.

Mississippi has nation’s highest COVID-19 hospitalization rate

And yet the idiot that Mississippians elected, Tate Reeves or as most of us call him  Tater Tot, downplayed the effects of the virus and we see where that got the state….apparently Tater Tot was waiting for Donald the Orange to tell him what to do….

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves issued a shelter-in-place order for the entire state on Wednesday as new COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to mount in the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The declaration will go into effect at 5 p.m. on Friday and last until 8 a.m. on April 20.

“Every day, for the last several weeks, I have asked our health experts whether it is time for the ultimate action of a shelter-in-place order statewide,” Reeves said. “Yesterday, for the first time, we got the answer we had been anticipating. They told me we are now at the point in Mississippi’s cycle where such drastic restrictions are required. Today is the day. We are announcing a shelter-in-place order.”

We have finally got our local shelter in place order and it came with a curfew as well….

One by one coastal cities throughout Harrison County are issuing orders to help keep communities safe during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Words from Coastal city leadership as the outbreak of COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc throughout the world.

Biloxi issued a shelter in place order, D’Iberville issued a stay-at-home order and Long Beach issued a stay-at-home order, and Gulfport issued a safer at home order. Gulfport Mayor Billy Hewes said, “It’s gotten to the point where even with the measures we put in place a couple weeks ago that they are not having the effect we’d hoped for. We’re continuing see the spread of COVID-19 in our community.”

Each order carries a nightly curfew from 11 p.m. until 5 a.m. “Most businesses can still remain active to a limited fashion. They have to make sure they limit things to ten people or less and don’t allow people inside their store greater than ten. They have to have the social distances, six feet apart, in place. If you are in a line of work and it’s articulated in this order that, if you’re a workout gym facility, a barbershop, a salon, places where you have to be in close proximity to people, those businesses we told need to shut down.”

Stay home orders issued throughout Harrison County

Come Thursday at 11 p.m., a curfew will be in place nightly from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m., applying to all but few who travel roads within Biloxi city limits until further notice. Biloxi Police Chief John Miller said, “There are just a lot of people who are maintaining their jobs at night, so those people we are certainly going to let go to and from work at night without any problems-anybody in the medical field, military, all those folks will be able to go to work and go home without a problem.”

It’s all part of an emergency order issued and signed off on by Biloxi Mayor Andrew ‘FoFo Gilch this week, an order that also requires businesses with close contact among customers to also shut down until further notice come early Thursday morning at 12:01 a.m. “The tattoo businesses, the spas, the hair salons, nail salons, all those things right now are going to be asked to shut down. It’s a mandatory shut down.”

It will be inconvenient for me for I walk MoMo at 0400 hrs to avoid people and traffic…..I will adjust to 0500 hrs and avoid people and traffic instead off the usual time.

Watch This Blog!

Be calm…..avoid crowds…..remain prepared….and wash hands often……

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”