Here We Go Again

Closing Thought–08Oct20

Today is Thursday and a storm is just hours away from landfall……Once again my region is looking into the mouth of a beast of a storm….this time it is Hurricane Delta…..

Good news for my area but not so much for storm weary Louisiana…..

For the sixth time in the Atlantic hurricane season, people in Louisiana are once more fleeing the state’s barrier islands and sailing boats to safe harbor while emergency officials ramp up command centers and consider ordering evacuations. The storm being watched Wednesday was Hurricane Delta, the 25th named storm of the Atlantic’s unprecedented hurricane season. Forecasts placed most of Louisiana within Delta’s path, with the latest National Hurricane Center estimating landfall in the state on Friday, the AP reports. The center’s forecasters warned of winds that could gust well above 100mph and up to 11 feet of ocean water potentially rushing onshore when the storm’s center hits land. “This season has been relentless,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said, dusting off his now common refrain of 2020: “Prepare for the worst. Pray for the best.”

A hurricane warning has been issued for a stretch of the northern US Gulf Coast. The National Hurricane Center in Miami said Delta is expected to become a major hurricane again, like it was days earlier before crossing part of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. But some weakening is forecast once Delta approaches the northern Gulf Coast on Friday. So far, Louisiana has seen both major strikes and near misses. The southwest area of the state around Lake Charles, which forecasts show is on Delta’s current trajectory, is still recovering from an Aug. 27 landfall by Category 4 Hurricane Laura. New Orleans spent a few days last month bracing for Hurricane Sally before it skirted to the east, making landfall in Alabama on Sept. 16. Louisiana saw heavy flooding June 7 from Tropical Storm Cristobal; Tropical Storm Beta prompted tropical storm warnings in mid-September as it slowly crawled up the northeast Texas coast; and Tropical Storm Marco looked like it might deliver the first half of a hurricane double-blow with Laura, but nearly dissipated before hitting the state near the mouth of the Mississippi River on Aug. 24. And there are nearly eight weeks of hurricane season left.

Just wanted to let my regulars know that if I do not appear for awhile it is because we lost our internet and that I shall return as soon as possible.

Once again a closing tune for the day…..

See you guys when I can……

Be Well…Be Safe……

Mississippi Votes

Mississippi will be voting on many issues from its racist past.

The people will be voting on the replacement of the flag from the reconstruction….and it will also be voting on the “Old Boys” network that has made it all but impossible for a person of color from winning a statewide position like governor or attorney general et al.

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/president-trump-confirms-he-first-lady-melania-trump-tested-positive-for-coronavirus

It was 1987 when Mississippi did away with the ban on interracial marriages.

In 1967, 17 Southern states (all the former slave states plus West Virginia plus Oklahoma) still enforced laws prohibiting marriage between whites and non-whites. Maryland repealed its law at the start of Loving v. Virginia in the Supreme Court.

After the Supreme Court ruling declaring such laws to be unconstitutional, the laws in the remaining 16 states ceased to be enforceable. Besides removing such laws from their statute books, a number of state constitutions were also amended to remove language prohibiting miscegenation: Mississippi in 1987, South Carolina in 1998 and Alabama in 2000. In the respective referendums, 52% of voters in Mississippi, 62% of voters in South Carolina and 59% of voters in Alabama voted in favour of the amendments. In Alabama nearly 526,000 people voted against the amendment, including a majority of voters in some rural counties.

(wikipedia)

Think about that….1987 is only 33 years ago that the ban went into effect.

This social issue has a long history…..

Centuries before the same-sex marriage movement, the U.S. government, its constituent states, and their colonial predecessors tackled the controversial issue of “miscegenation,” or mixture of races. It’s widely known that the Deep South banned interracial marriages until 1967, but less widely known is that many other states did the same. California, for example, prohibited these marriages until 1948. In addition, politicians made three brazen attempts to ban interracial marriages nationally by amending the U.S. Constitution.

https://www.thoughtco.com/interracial-marriage-laws-721611

Now we  Mississippians have a chance to do away with even more of the racist history by voting in November.

Mississippi voters have never elected a Black candidate to statewide office, despite having the largest proportional Black population of any U.S. state at nearly 40%.

Advocates hope an amendment on the November ballot may change that.

Mississippi is the only state with a multistep process for electing statewide positions like governor, attorney general and secretary of state. Its electoral college-like voting system was designed by white framers in Southern Reconstruction with the intent to disenfranchise minority voters and uphold white power in politics.

If the amendment to simplify the process passes, advocates say it would spur more minority candidates to run for office in the Magnolia state — and assure minority voters their constitutionally protected right to equal representation is secure. If it doesn’t, they say it will serve as a painful reminder of the state’s deep history of voter suppression.

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/mississippi-vote-jim-crow-era-law-designed-secure/story

Maybe now Mississippi can move into the 21st century….something that has been resisted for many years…..

Hopefully all my readers are having a good weekend….be well….be safe…….

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–15Sep20

Here comes Sally!

I apologize for the slack posts today but I must take time to make sure the house and property are secure…..

Usually the first thing to go is the internet…then the power…..so I try to get as much done on IST as I can before the fall.

The forecast is that the eye should come ashore between Biloxi and Destin…..Biloxi is about 10 miles East of my house…..so if true we will get rain and wind…..the forecast is about 8 inches of rain.

The one saving grace here is that as I write this post the storm seems to be weakening a bit…..but that is before landfall….so lots can happen between then and now….

I am far enough off the beach to avoid any storm surge….local flooding will be a problem.

If I disappear off WP for awhile it is because the storm has kicked our butts….but not to worry….I will return as soon as I can.

Be well….Be safe…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Flag: And The Winner Is…..

The weekend begins and Mississippi is about to enter the 21st century….a long journey to arrive there….

I have been keeping my readers up to date on the journey my state of Mississippi is having replacing the the racist flag from the past.

It began with this……https://lobotero.com/2020/06/18/state-flag-is-gone/

The finalists are here…..https://lobotero.com/2020/08/30/which-one-will-it-be/

And now we have a winner of the Mississippi state flag lotto…..

Mississippi voters will decide whether to accept a new state flag with a magnolia to replace an old one legislators retired under pressure because it included the Confederate battle emblem that’s widely seen as racist, the AP reports. A commission on Wednesday voted 8-1 to recommend the magnolia over one other final design that featured a shield with wavy lines representing water. “We’ll send a message that we live in the future and not in the past,” former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Reuben Anderson, the flag commission chairman, said after the vote. The single design will go on the November ballot. If voters accept the design, it will become the new state flag. If they reject it, the design process will start anew—and Mississippi will remain a state without a flag for a while longer.

The commission decided Wednesday that in the weeks leading to the November election, it will promote the magnolia flag by calling it the “In God We Trust” flag. “More than any other time in our country, we need the mercy and grace of God,” said commission member TJ Taylor, who is an attorney and policy director for the state House speaker. After the meeting Wednesday, the magnolia flag was raised on a pole outside the Old Capitol Museum in Jackson, where it fluttered in a brisk breeze. Requiring the religious phrase on the new flag helped persuade some conservative legislators to retire the old one. Legislators shelved the Confederate-themed flag two months ago against the backdrop of widespread protests over racial injustice.

And the winner is…..

At least this flag is heads above the runner-up…..

Enjoy your Labor Day weekend with family and friends…..

Be well and be safe

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–01Sep20

Is your state a “hard working” or is it a “slacker” state?

Despite massive unemployment right now across the nation, WalletHub finds that Americans work pretty darn hard—whether it’s because they want to, have to, or have the perception they have to. To find out which states really roll up their sleeves, the site looked at all 50 states across 10 key metrics involving both direct work factors—ie, the average number of hours in a workweek and the share of workers that don’t touch their vacation time—and indirect ones, including how much time people put in volunteering and enjoying leisure activities. It turns out North Dakotans top the list, while West Virginia could use some motivation. Read on to see which other states have bragging rights when it comes to working hard:

  1. North Dakota
  2. Alaska
  3. Wyoming
  4. Texas
  5. Nebraska
  6. Oklahoma
  7. Colorado
  8. Virginia
  9. Maryland
  10. Hawaii

Read on for the states that don’t work quite as hard.

  1. Arizona
  2. Mississippi
  3. Oregon
  4. New York
  5. Connecticut
  6. Ohio
  7. Michigan
  8. Rhode Island
  9. New Mexico
  10. West Virginia

See how other states fare here

My state is number 42…so “slacker” would be the call.

What about your state?

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Which One Will It Be?

Mississippi is in the process of choosing a new state flag to replace the tired old relic from the Old South….

As Mississippi replaces its former flag that had the Confederate battle emblem, five proposals were literally run up a flagpole Tuesday. A group then narrowed the choice to two designs: One with a shield and one with a magnolia. “When you fly a flag up a flagpole, it sure does look different than it does on paper,” said the chairman of the nine-member flag commission, former state Supreme Court Justice Reuben Anderson. Commissioners will choose a single design next week, and that will go on the Nov. 3 ballot for voters to accept or reject, the AP reports. By law, the old flag with the Confederate battle emblem is not an option, and the replacement cannot have the emblem that’s widely condemned as racist. Legislators also mandated that the new flag include the phrase, “In God We Trust.”

Each of the final designs contains a single star made of diamond shapes to represent the Native American people who lived in Mississippi before others arrived. The magnolia design has 21 stars, with one representing the Choctaws, Chickasaws and other tribes, and the others representing Mississippi as the 20th state. If a majority of those voting in the November election accept the lone design, it will become the new state flag. If they reject it, the design process will begin again and another design will go on the ballot later. The final five designs were: the shield with wavy lines representing water; one with the Mississippi River snaking along the state’s western border, plus a magnolia blossom; one with a magnolia blossom on a white background; one with the magnolia blossom on a dark blue background; and one with a stylized magnolia tree.

And now the final two…..

Commissioners will choose a single design next week, and that will go on the Nov. 3 ballot for voters to accept or reject.

By law, the old flag with the Confederate battle emblem is not an option, and the replacement cannot have the emblem that’s widely condemned as racist. Legislators also mandated that the new flag include the phrase, “In God We Trust.”

Each of the final designs contains a single star made of diamond shapes to represent the Native American people who lived in Mississippi before others arrived. The magnolia design has 21 stars, with one representing the Choctaws, Chickasaws and other tribes, and the others representing Mississippi as the 20th state.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is putting the designs online so people — inside or outside the state — can vote on their favorite. But the online voting is not binding. Commissioners can choose their own favorite to put on the ballot.

If a majority of those voting in the November election accept the lone design, it will become the new state flag. If they reject it, the design process will begin again and another design will go on the ballot later.

Which will it be…..Contestant Number One?

Or Contestant Number Two?

No. One looks like a corporate flag….so since Mississippi is the Magnolia State I vote for No. Two.

Which do you think will be the winner?   Of the two I like No.2 better…..No. 1 looks like a corporate flag or something like that…..

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Killer Katrina

15 years ago today Hurricane Katrina roared ashore killing and destruction of all in its path…..My father and I rode the storm out in our house since he refused to leave his house I had no choice but to stay with him since he was in a wheelchair and make sure he was alright.

The storm lasted 13 hours and 43 minutes….you cannot imagine how long that felt.

August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States. When the storm made landfall, it had a Category 3 rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale–it brought sustained winds of 100–140 miles per hour–and stretched some 400 miles across.

https://www.history.com/topics/natural-disasters-and-environment/hurricane-katrina

Here are a few things that most people that were not effected by the storm know…..

Hurricane Katrina was the largest and 3rd strongest hurricane ever recorded to make landfall in the US.

In New Orleans, the levees were designed for Category 3, but Katrina peaked at a Category 5 hurricane, with winds up to 175 mph.

The final death toll was at 1,836, primarily from Louisiana (1,577) and Mississippi (238). More than half of these victims were senior citizens. Keep seniors safe and sound, and help them plan for hurricane season.

The storm surge from Katrina was 20-ft (six meters) high.

705 people are reported as still missing as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

Hurricane Katrina affected over 15 million people in different ways varying from having to evacuate their homes, rising gas prices, and the economy suffering.

An estimated 80% of New Orleans was under water, up to 20 ft deep in places.

Hurricane Katrina caused $81 billion in property damages, but it is estimated that the total economic impact in Louisiana and Mississippi may exceed $150 billion, earning the title of costliest hurricane ever in US history

Hurricane Katrina impacted about 90,000 square miles.

The region affected by the storm supported roughly 1 million non-farm jobs, and still, hundreds of thousands of local residents were left unemployed by the hurricane.

More than 70 countries pledged monetary donations or other assistance after the hurricane. Kuwait made the largest single pledge of $500 million, but Qatar, India, China, Pakistan and Bangladesh made very large donations as well.

My family has ridden out two of the most powerful storms in history…..Camille and Katrina…..for those too young to remember 1969….may I help you out?

August 17 in 1969, Hurricane Camille made landfall along the Mississippi Gulf Coast near Waveland, MS. Camille is one of only FOUR Category 5 hurricanes ever to make landfall in the continental United States (Atlantic Basin)

Camille ranks as the 2nd most intense hurricane to strike the continental US with 900 mb pressure and landfall intensity of 150 knots. Camille ranks just below the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane with 892 mb and 160 knots, while slightly stronger than Hurricane Andrew with 922 mb and 145 knots and Hurricane Michael with 919 mb and 140 knots. The actual maximum sustained winds of Hurricane Camille are not known as the hurricane destroyed all the wind-recording instruments in the landfall area. Re-analysis data found peak winds of 150 knots (roughly 175 mph) along the coast. A devastating storm tide of 24.6 feet occurred west of our area in Pass Christian, MS.

https://www.weather.gov/mob/camille

And now we have dodged a bullet this time…..but there is always another storm eyeing the Mississippi Gulf Coast…..

“lego ergo scribo”

Satsumas–WTF?

On my property I have several citrus trees….tangerine and satsuma and both bear fruit every year….as a matter of fact these two bear excessive amount of fruit that I must share with the neighbors and family.

Satsumas are ripen first and by the time they are exhausted then the tangerines ripen…..

This year’s crop is making me talk to myself…..first it is going to be a bumper crop (more fruit than usual)

Image

….and then we had a wet months of June and July and then I started noticing this and it just kept getting worse and worse….

Image

Image

So far I have not been able to find what the problem is that would make these satsumas to split and fall from the tree.

Luckily the picking season is close and there are still many satsumas left on the tree……

Next my pepper plants are squirting peppers out at an rapid rate…..this is just one picking

Image

Now the question is what do I do with so many peppers for there is no way that I can eat the peppers quick enough so what should I do?

Share with family?  Not big into hot peppers….what to do…..what to do?

I decided to make pepper sauce (peppers in vinegar)……an excellent addition to greens and beans…..

Image

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All those peppers are from one plant and there is many more waiting to be picked…

Just to catch my regular visitors up on the situation with the Old Professor…..

Be Well….Be Safe…..Enjoy Your Saturday

“lego ergo scribo”

Closing Thought–07Aug20

Recently my state of Mississippi has removed its offensive flag https://lobotero.com/2020/06/27/mississippi-flag-again/ ……..and is in the process of trying to design a new one…..

These are the designs to choose from……

The Commission to Redesign the Mississippi State Flag has received nearly 3,000 submissions that meet the legislative criteria. View the flags here.

My choice is here…

16 Best Mississippi Flag Concepts images | Mississippi flag ...

That one design should not offend the sensibilities of anyone.

This one is another that I like…

Magnolia Flag (@MagnoliaFlag) | Twitter

The commissioners will each choose twenty-five flags by August 7, narrowing the entries to a maximum of 225. Commission members will then rank their top ten choices.

During the next meeting on August 14, the commissioners will select five flags for final consideration. These five flags will be placed on the MDAH website for public comment.

Read more about the process here.

See one you like?

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Mississippi’s Pandemic Panic

Closing Thought–04Aug20

This pandemic has been raging through our country now for several months…..it has effected every portion of society and cause so many deaths to the tune of 155,000.

Most of us bloggers are helping people understand what is happening in most countries and states…..I have been reporting on my state Mississippi.

These days the South is a new “hot spot” where the virus seems to be running through the society….I will admit that the governor here has done a better job than some of the other Southern governors….but that has not saved Mississippi from the outcome.

Mississippi–Cases–61,125  Deaths–1711

Plus Mississippi could gain in its standing…..

Florida is currently the No. 1 state when it comes to new coronavirus cases per capita—but Mississippi is on track to overtake it, NPR reports. In a grim Twitter thread, Harvard researcher Ashish Jha says Mississippi is “doing VERY badly but has received little attention.” Testing is down 8% from two weeks ago in the state, but cases are up 37% in the same time frame; the daily death toll is skyrocketing; and much of the state is open with few restrictions and no statewide mask mandate. Plus, as one state doctor puts it, hospital ICUs are getting crowded and COVID-19 is “layered on top of our existing challenges,” as the state has high levels of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and obesity.

A fellow blogger and follower of IST has written about the possibility of the dead being piled up in the street because there is no room for them…..https://linesbyliming.com/

Mississippi has a major problem…..the morgues are having a hard time dealing with the amount of deaths.

In the months before his county’s morgue neared capacity, before he started wearing his face shield and “moon suit” to answer calls in neighbors’ homes, and before his own coronavirus diagnosis got him admitted to the hospital, Coahoma County, Mississippi, coroner Scotty Meredith knew this summer was going to be the worst in his three decades on the job. 

On April 3, as COVID-19 deaths in Mississippi hovered in the low double-digits, the state’s chief medical examiner, Mark LeVaughn, fired off a letter to Meredith and the state’s 80 other coroners. State law outlines a simple procedure for investigating deaths outside a hospital: the coroner collects evidence at the scene, then sends the body to a medical examiner in Jackson for autopsy. But the gist of the ME’s letter, obtained by The Daily Beast, was that when it came to deaths from COVID-19, coroners were on their own.

For years now, the severely understaffed state medical examiner’s office has struggled to handle all of the deaths in Mississippi. Doing so has often meant shifting more of the burden for handling deaths onto county coroners, who, unlike medical examiners, usually don’t have a medical degree and cannot perform autopsies. 

The problem with being shut out from the medical examiner’s office, as Meredith explained, “is not just that they’re not taking the cases, but there’s not any guidance” for what to do with a suspected coronavirus case. Several coroners said they’ve begun rationing supplies, like test kits, echoing supply-chain woes in other hard-hit states since the early days of the pandemic that experts generally believe have deflated the COVID-19 death count.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/amid-a-mississippi-coronavirus-surge-morgues-are-overflowing-and-coroners-are-scared

The horror stories just keeps building and the leadership that is missing keeps downplaying all the problems this pandemic has created.

Be Well…..Be Safe

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”