I’ve About Had Enough!

It seems that the American people have lots to say about the killings in routine traffic stops….lots to say…..but that is as far as it goes….talk and as the old saying goes ‘talk is cheap’.

This last trial as it was waiting a verdict another young black man was killed not 10 miles away from the courthouse….the verdict will change nothing….do you comprehend the term ‘NOTHING’?

All the words typed by me and others and all the words uttered by so-called pundit and experts means NOTHING….again does that word mean anything to you?

For example while I was typing this draft….

Body camera footage and 911 audio released late Friday appeared to show that an unidentified Virginia deputy mistook a cordless house phone held by a Black man for a gun before the deputy shot him repeatedly, per the AP. Family members said Isaiah Brown, 32, was in intensive care with 10 bullet wounds following the shooting outside a home in Spotsylvania County early Wednesday, WRC-TV reported. The body camera video shows the deputy arriving at the scene and yelling at Brown to show his hands. The deputy then yells, “drop the gun,” multiple times and appears to say over his radio, “he’s got a gun to his head.” The deputy then yells, “stop walking towards me, stop walking towards me” and “stop, stop” before firing at least seven shots.

The deputy had earlier given Brown a ride home after his car broke down. At some point later, 911 was called. Isaiah Brown is heard on the call saying his brother won’t let him into his mother’s room in the house. Brown then says, “alright, give me the gun” to which his brother is heard in the background saying, “no.” The dispatcher asks what’s going on, and Brown replied “I’m about to kill my brother.” The dispatcher says “don’t kill your brother,” and asks Brown multiple times if he’s armed. He says no. The deputy arrived shortly after and can be heard yelling at Brown on the 911 audio. After the shots are fired, the deputy is heard rendering aid to Brown and instructing the brother to get a first aid kit out of his patrol vehicle. It’s unclear whether the deputy knew Brown told the dispatcher he wasn’t armed. The deputy has been placed on administrative leave.

Nothing will change because the culture remains.

The police culture needs to change….not reformed…..reformed does nothing to prevent these types of killings from occurring……

Lots of ink has been given to the verdict and what it means.

It means that a murderer was convicted not an indictment of the police…..the police is the problem and no one wants to tackle the necessity for a cultural change.

Right now the story in the media is the verdict and the aftermath….but that will soon wane as the story line gets pushed off the front page so to speak.

But why is this festering cancer of police killings allowed to continue?

This article was written while the Chauvin trial was in process…..

Police officers have long disputed that they treat people of color differently based on race despite available historical, statistical and anecdotal evidence showing the opposite, as my colleague Perry Bacon Jr. reported last year. While we don’t have a ton of data on the political views of police officers, a 2016 survey from the Pew Research Center of 8,000 police officers nationwide found that 67 percent believed the deaths of Black people during police encounters were isolated incidents, compared with only 31 percent who saw it as signs of a broader problem. This was the exact opposite of how the general public felt: Thirty-nine percent of U.S. adults said they thought the killings were isolated incidents versus 60 percent who felt it was indicative of a broader problem. And Black Americans were even more likely than white Americans to say police killings were a sign of a broader problem, 79 percent to 54 percent. An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found last year that nearly half of Black Americans — 48 percent — have very little to no confidence at all that local police treat Black and white people the same; just 12 percent of white Americans had the same view. 

The pressure on local lawmakers to enact lasting change is fleeting, depending on the news cycle and current events. Even at the height of calls for police reform, getting bills turned into laws takes time, said Rashawn Ray, a sociology professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, who studies police-civilian relation. Ray told me there was an uptick in calls for police-related reforms at both the local, state and federal levels after Floyd’s death since the Black Lives Matter movement became mainstream. “[Black Lives Matter] wasn’t a global movement in 2014,” he said, referring to the year Michael Brown was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. “People have become more aware of what’s happening. … The movement for Black lives and the attention to mistreatment by police has led to this moment.”

How Views On Black Lives Matter Have Changed — And Why That Makes Police Reform So Hard

Even if a federal law is passed (not going to happen in this Congress) there still leaves all the states and their states rights BS that need to change as well.

Will it?

Not in my lifetime.

If the people are not willing to force change….then maybe the best thing to do is STFU!

More reading for this subject…..

Is It Police Reform….Or Defund….Or Abolition?

Police Reform?

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

13 thoughts on “I’ve About Had Enough!

  1. Ten bullets? The words ‘excessive force’ come to mind. The cops there seem to panic unduly, and don’t appear to have any policy of shooting to disable or disarm. Someone needs to delve deeply into their basic police firearms training.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    1. I heard one ex-police chief say that shooting at mass save lives and disarming shots could injure civilians…..I thought it was the dumbest crap I had ever heard….chuq

  2. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:

    I’m beyond REFORM … “Nothing will change because the culture remains. The police culture needs to change … not eformed … reformed does nothing to prevent these types of killings from occurring … “! As always … “If the people are not willing to force change … then maybe the best thing to do is STFU!”

      1. I’ll be here … I think there’s plenty to say. This isn’t going away any time soon. Since the verdict, I believe there have been 6 police shootings? I just don’t get whhy the first step is the gun!! SMGH!!

  3. My mom and I lived in a predominantly African American neighborhood in Sacramento California from July 2011-early April 2014 needless to say, we saw a lot of what happens, and it’s not good. The cops are out of control.

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