The 100 Days Of Misery

War is a barbaric, chaotic and ugly period of time when all sanity has left the room.

I have been writing about World War One for a couple of years now…..a war fought 100 years ago that was to become one of the bloodiest….there was a period towards the end of the war that was some of the worse fighting of the war.

The Hundred Days (18 July-11 November 1918) was the final Allied offensive of the First World War on the Western Front. The stalemate on the Western Front had been broken by the great German offensives of the spring and summer of 1918, which had pushed the Allies back up to forty miles and created a series of huge salients in the Allied line. They had failed to achieve their main objective, which had been to separate the British from the French and capture the channel ports, and had drained much of the strength out of the German army.

One result of the crisis caused by the first of the German offensive (second battle of the Somme), had been the appointment of Marshal Foch as commander-in-chief of all Allied armies on the Western Front. As the German offensives began to run out of power, Foch began to plan the Allied counterattack. This was to begin with a series of attacks designed to eliminate the salients in preparation for a final campaign in 1919. If the initial attacks went well, then Foch hoped to launch a major offensive that he hoped would push the Germans back off French soil. Even if that succeeded, there was every chance that the Germans might choose to defend their own borders, leaving the final campaign still to be fought.

Source: The Hundred Days, 18 July-11 November 1918

We need to remind ourselves of these wars….we do not….and that is why we keep making the same silly mistakes decade after decade.

Bullets are not always the answer.

Class Dismissed!

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5 thoughts on “The 100 Days Of Misery

  1. I spent two hours last night watching commemorative documentaries about WW1 on the BBC. There was one about the naval battles at Dogger Bank, and Jutland, and another about the Home Defences; coastal batteries and trench systems designed to counter German raids. It was all very interesting, and moving too. At least the BBC are keeping the memories alive.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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