Little Man–A Farewell

This is one of the most difficult posts I have ever tried to write…..and it is sad news…..and a terribly sad day.

I recently introduced readers to my wife’s Chihuahua mix, Sebastian AKA Little Man…for those that missed his story here is the post……https://lobotero.com/2021/01/10/little-man/

This obituary has taken me 5 days to compose….to say it has been difficult would be an understatement.

I wrote about his ordeal in his last surgery…..

The mass that was removed from his neck was a cancer and aggression form of cancer  While he was recovering but not as well as he could.

He began being listless and visit to the vet told us that the aggressive cancer was in his organs….and that caused him to have a stroke…..he got to the point of confusion would not eat or drink water…..we tried to feed him but he lost 3 pounds in 5 days.

Sue and I talked it over and we decided that he needed to stop suffering and go out with as much dignity as he could.

We took him to the vet and had him relieve his suffering.

He passed with serenity and with dignity in  the arms of Sue.  Even the girls at the vet’s cried and said good-bye for he had become one of their favorites.

There is so much I want to say about Little Man…but words will not do him justice and illustrate the love he had while part of our family.

He came to live with us and immediately fell in love with Jaz (another friend and family member…https://lobotero.com/2018/06/06/saying-good-bye-to-a-friend/)…..and because of his coloration we had to put an orange bandana so we could find him in the property plus he was an superb escape artist and would find a way to get out of the fence and go exploring which would panic me because he was so small.

Then when he met my wife and he fell in love with her and he became Sue’s companion.  He had to be close to Sue no matter where she was….

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They say that animals have no soul….I disagree for Little Man had more soul than many people I know.

He was a great companion and friend to the family….we could not have asked for a better family member.  He never met anyone he did not like….especially females (yes he was a ‘rogue’)

He passed very comfortably in Sue’s arms.

I wish him well and he can finally be reunited with his best friend Jaz….I know they are already getting into trouble together….as they roam Elysian Fields.

Little Man we love you and you will be forever be missed.

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Your spirit is free and we shall be together again….you will be our “Little Man” forever.

Love you for all eternity.

Sebastian “Little Man”  18 January 2021  R.I.P.

Gone …..NEVER Forgotten

R.I.P. In 2020

WE know of all the “famous” people that died in 2020 like country singer Charlie Pride and RBG and Eddie Van Halen among others but there were others that were equally important and this post is just my way of acknowledging their passing….

Elizabeth Wurtzel, 52. Her blunt and painful confessions of her struggles with addiction and depression in the bestselling Prozac Nation made her a voice and a target for an anxious generation. Jan. 7. Sultan Qaboos bin Said, 79. He was the Mideast’s longest-ruling monarch who seized power in Oman in a 1970 palace coup and pulled his Arabian sultanate into modernity while carefully balancing diplomatic ties between adversaries Iran and the US. Jan. 11. Thomas Railsback, 87. An Illinois Republican congressman who helped draw up articles of impeachment against President Nixon in 1974. Jan. 20. Bernard Ebbers, 78. The former chief of WorldCom who was convicted in one of the largest corporate accounting scandals in U.S. history. Feb. 2. Charles “Chuckie” O’Brien, 86. A longtime associate of Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa who became a leading suspect in the labor leader’s disappearance and later was portrayed in the Martin Scorsese film, The Irishman. Feb. 13. Sy Sperling, 78. The Hair Club for Men founder who was famous for the TV commercials where he proclaimed “I’m not only the Hair Club president but I’m also a client.” Feb. 19. Thich Quang Do, 91. A Buddhist monk who became the public face of religious dissent in Vietnam while the Communist government kept him in prison or under house arrest for more than 20 years. Feb. 22.

Max von Sydow, 90. The actor known to art house audiences through his work with Swedish director Ingmar Bergman and later to moviegoers everywhere when he played the priest in the horror classic The Exorcist. March 8. Rev. Darius L. Swann, 95. His challenge to the notion of segregated public schools helped spark the use of busing to integrate schools across the country. March 8. Tom Dempsey, 73. The NFL kicker born without toes on his kicking foot who made a then-record 63-yard field goal. April 4. Earl Graves Sr., 85. He championed Black businesses as the founder of the first African American-owned magazine focusing on Black entrepreneurs. April 6. Herbert Stempel, 93. A fall guy and whistleblower of early television whose confession to deliberately losing on a 1950s quiz show helped drive a national scandal and join his name in history to winning contestant Charles Van Doren. April 7. Linda Tripp, 70. Her secretly taped conversations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky provided evidence of an affair with President Bill Clinton that led to his impeachment. April 8. Phyllis Lyon, 95. A gay rights pioneer who, with her longtime partner, was among the first same-sex couples to marry in California when it became legal to do so in 2008. April 9.
Astrid Kirchherr, 81. She was the German photographer who shot some of the earliest and most striking images of the Beatles and helped shape their trend-setting visual style. May 12.

Ken Osmond, 76. On TV’s Leave It to Beaver, he played two-faced teenage scoundrel Eddie Haskell, a role so memorable it left him typecast and led to a second career as a police officer. May 18. Christo, 84. He was known for massive, ephemeral public arts projects that often involved wrapping large structures in fabric. May 31. Shigeru Yokota, 87. A Japanese campaigner for the return of his daughter and more than a dozen others who were abducted to North Korea in the 1970s. June 5. Bonnie Pointer, 69. She convinced three of her church-singing siblings to form the Pointer Sisters, which would become one of the biggest acts of the 1970s and ’80s. June 8. Charles Webb, 81. A lifelong nonconformist whose debut novel The Graduate was a deadpan satire of his college education and wealthy background adapted into the classic film of the same name. June 16. Milton Glaser, 91. The groundbreaking graphic designer who adorned Bob Dylan’s silhouette with psychedelic hair and summed up the feelings for his home state with “I (HEART) NY.” June 26. Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr., 82. He was the last of three one-time Ku Klux Klansmen convicted in a 1963 Alabama church bombing that killed four Black girls and was the deadliest single attack of the civil rights movement. June 26.

Mary Kay Letourneau, 58. A teacher who married her former sixth-grade student after she was convicted of raping him in a case that drew international headlines. July 6. Joanna Cole, 75. The author whose Magic School Bus books transported millions of young people on extraordinary and educational adventures. July 12. Connie Culp, 57. She was the recipient of the first partial face transplant in the US. July 29. Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, 83. A prolific Jewish scholar who spent 45 years compiling a monumental and ground-breaking translation of the Talmud. Aug. 7. Gail Sheehy, 83. A journalist, commentator and pop sociologist whose best-selling Passages helped millions navigate their lives from early adulthood to middle age and beyond. Aug. 24. Lady Yvonne Sursock Cochrane, 98. One of Lebanon’s most prominent philanthropists and a pioneer defender of the country’s heritage. Aug. 31. Injuries suffered from a massive explosion in Beirut.

Kaing Guek Eav, 77. Known as Duc, he was the Khmer Rouge’s chief jailer, who admitted overseeing the torture and killings of as many as 16,000 Cambodians while running the regime’s most notorious prison. Sept. 2. Winston Groom, 77. The writer whose novel Forrest Gump was made into a six-Oscar winning 1994 movie that became a soaring pop culture phenomenon. Sept. 17. Rev. Robert Graetz, 92. The only white minister to support the Montgomery bus boycott and who became the target of scorn and bombings for doing so. Sept. 20. Ang Rita, 72. A veteran Nepalese Sherpa guide who was the first person to climb Mount Everest 10 times. Sept. 21. Timothy Ray Brown, 54. He made history as “the Berlin patient,” the first person known to be cured of HIV infection. Sept. 29. Bernard S. Cohen, 86. He won a landmark case that led to the Supreme Court’s rejection of laws forbidding interracial marriage and later went on to a successful political career as a state legislator. Oct. 12. Christopher Pendergast, 71. A suburban New York teacher who turned a Lou Gehrig’s disease diagnosis into a decades-long campaign to raise awareness and fund research. Oct. 14. James Randi, 92. A magician who later challenged spoon benders, mind readers and faith healers with such voracity that he became regarded as the country’s foremost skeptic. Oct. 20.

Diane di Prima, 86. A poet, activist and teacher who was one of the last surviving members of the Beats and one of the few women writers in the Beat movement. Oct. 25. David Dinkins, 93. He broke barriers as New York City’s first African American mayor but was doomed to a single term by a soaring murder rate, stubborn unemployment and his mishandling of a riot in Brooklyn. Nov. 23. Dave Prowse, 85. The British weightlifter-turned-actor who was the body, though not the voice, of archvillain Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy. Nov. 28. Rafer Johnson, 86. He won the decathlon at the 1960 Rome Olympics and helped subdue Robert F. Kennedy’s assassin in 1968. Dec. 2. Charles “Chuck” Yeager, 97. The World War II fighter pilot ace and quintessential test pilot who in 1947 became the first person to fly faster than sound. Dec. 7.

So many…..

May their families and friends find the peace of mind that they need.

May they all Rest In Peace

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

Say Good-Bye to James Bond

Sad news…..I am a huge James Bond fan…..and was thrilled when they brought Ian Fleming’s books to the big screen…..now my favorite James Bond has died…..Sean Connery.

He was the first actor, and many say the best, to portray James Bond in the spy film series. Now, a goodbye to the original 007: The family of Sir Sean Connery says the Scottish actor has died at the age of 90, reports the BBC. Connery kicked off his role as a British MI6 agent in 1962’s Dr. No, based on the books by author Ian Fleming, and went on to star in seven of the franchise’s films. He was also known for his wide span of other movie roles, including The Hunt for Red October, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, The Rock, and 1987’s The Untouchables, for which he won a best supporting actor Oscar for his role as Irish cop Jimmy Malone.

Born Thomas Sean Connery in Edinburgh, Connery grew up poor and first toiled as an unskilled laborer, until he joined the Royal Navy at age 17, per Variety. He left a few years later due to health issues and worked various jobs before he started entering bodybuilding contests; he even placed third in an early-50s Mr. Universe competition. His trajectory changed when he moved to London and heard about a part in South Pacific: He took a crash course in singing and dancing and surprisingly got the part. He worked for various repertory companies in and near London for several years before his first Bond role. Connery was formally knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2000, earning him the right to use “Sir” in front of his name. Connery is survived by his wife of 40-plus years, Micheline Roquebrune, as well as son Jason Connery and a grandson.

I realize that Sean Connery was a masterful actor….but for me he brought a fiction hero to life and he will always be the best James Bond in my book…all the others were just pale imitations.

He was missed when the actor change came and he will be missed now.

May he Rest In Peace.

Please share your thoughts as well.

“lego ergo scribo”

Another One Gone

Closing Thought–07Oct20

It has been a terrible couple of weeks for music….we have lost Helen Reddy, Mac Davis, Eddie Van Halen and now Johnny Nash.

Johnny Nash, a singer-songwriter, actor, and producer who rose from pop crooner to early reggae star to the creator and performer of the million-selling anthem “I Can See Clearly Now,” died Tuesday, his son said. Nash, who had been in declining health, died of natural causes at home in Houston, the city of his birth, his son, Johnny Nash Jr., told the AP. He was 80. Nash was in his early 30s when “I Can See Clearly Now” topped the charts in 1972 and he had lived several show business lives. In the mid-1950s, he was a teenager covering “Darn That Dream” and other standards, his light tenor likened to the voice of Johnny Mathis. A decade later, he was co-running a record company, had become a rare American-born singer of reggae; he was among the first artists to bring reggae to US audiences and helped launch the career of his friend Bob Marley.

He peaked commercially in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when he had hits with “Hold Me Tight,” “You Got Soul,” an early version of Marley’s “Stir It Up,” and “I Can See Clearly Now,” still his signature song. Reportedly written by Nash while recovering from cataract surgery, “I Can See Clearly Now” was a story of overcoming hard times that itself raised the spirits of countless listeners, with its swelling pop-reggae groove, promise of a “bright, bright sunshiny day” and Nash’s gospel-styled exclamation midway, “Look straight ahead, nothing but blue skies!”, a backing chorus lifting the words into the heavens. The song, which Nash also produced, was covered by artists ranging from Ray Charles and Donny Osmond to Soul Asylum and Jimmy Cliff, whose version was featured in the 1993 movie Cool Runnings. It also turned up everywhere from Thelma and Louise to a Windex commercial, and in recent years was often referred to on websites about cataract procedures.

They will be missed……true musical talent has lost its founders.

Johnny’s biggest hit…….

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

2020 has been a horrible year….and it just got worse.

Sad news…..Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has from cancer.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday at her home in Washington, DC, reports the AP. She was 87. Ginsburg died of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer, the court says; it was her fifth bout with cancer since 1999. NPR reports that in the days before her death, Ginsburg dictated the following statement to her granddaughter, Clara Spera: “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

“Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said in a statement, per NPR. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent a lifetime flourishing in the face of adversity before being appointed a Supreme Court justice, where she successfully fought against gender discrimination and unified the liberal block of the court. She was born Joan Ruth Bader on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, New York. Her father was a furrier in the height of the Great Depression, and her mother worked in a garment factory. Ginsburg’s mother instilled a love of education in Ginsburg through her dedication to her brother; foregoing her own education to finance her brother’s college expenses.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg began her career as a justice where she left off as an advocate, fighting for women’s rights. In 1996, Ginsburg wrote the majority opinion in United States v. Virginia, holding that qualified women could not be denied admission to Virginia Military Institute. Her style in advocating from the bench matches her style from her time at the ACLU: slow but steady, and calculated. Instead of creating sweeping limitations on gender discrimination, she attacked specific areas of discrimination and violations of women’s rights one at a time, so as to send a message to the legislatures on what they can and cannot do. Her attitude is that major social change should not come from the courts, but from Congress and other legislatures. This method allows for social change to remain in Congress’ power while also receiving guidance from the court. Ginsburg does not shy away from giving pointed guidance when she feels the need. She dissented in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. where the plaintiff, a female worker being paid significantly less than males with her same qualifications, sued under Title VII but was denied relief under a statute of limitations issue. The facts of this case mixed her passion of federal procedure and gender discrimination. She broke with tradition and wrote a highly colloquial version of her dissent to read from the bench. She also called for Congress to undo this improper interpretation of the law in her dissent, and then worked with President Obama to pass the very first piece of legislation he signed, the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, a copy of which hangs proudly in her office.

She was a bright spot on the Court and she will be sadly missed.

My condolences to her family and fiends.

May she Rest In Peace

 

Closing Thought–18Sep20

50 years ago today….the music truly ceased.

Today is the 50th anniversary of the death of rock legend Jimi Hendrix….

Hendrix was born in Seattle in 1942, and was raised mainly by his father Al, since his mother struggled with family life.

Already as a child, Jimi was crazy about playing the guitar. Coming from a poor background, he never considered going to college, and joined the army in 1961 instead, a way for young Black men to make a decent living.

But after spending only one year with the paratroopers, Hendrix broke his ankle during a jump and had to be discharged from duty. That’s when Hendrix started to accompany different R&B bands. 

He went on tour with the Isley Brothers, Little Richard and many other stars of those days; his turf was the so-called Chitlin’ Circuit, an association of African-American dance clubs dotted across the eastern and southern United States. His start in the music business was anything but easy, yet Hendrix got to learn from some of the best and fiercest performers of his time.

https://www.dw.com/en/jimi-hendrix-still-a-legend-50-years-after-his-death/a-54911395

I was fortunate enough to see Jimi in a club called the “Oleo Strut”…..the club held about 200 people and it cost me 2 dollars to get in the door.

Let me close out the week with a few Hendrix songs….and remember.

All Along The Watch Tower…..

Hey Joe……

Jimi has been missed for 50 years….without his guitar we wind up with crap like Nickleback.

Jime Hendrix…..1942-1970……

The Real Day The Music Died.

“lego ergo scribo”

Say Goodbye To A Legend

Yesterday the world got some sad news…..rock legend, Little Richard had died…..

Reactions are rolling in to the death of rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Little Richard, who died Saturday at 87, the AP reports. Among them:

  • “I’m so saddened to hear about the passing of Little Richard, he was the biggest inspiration of my early teens and his music still has the same raw electric energy when you play it now as it did when it first shot through the music scene in the mid 50’s,” Mick Jagger wrote on social media. “… I will miss you Richard, God bless.”
  • “Absolutely heartbroken this morning at hearing the news of the passing of my brother & friend, the great Little Richard,” Quincy Jones wrote on social media. “From our connection through our mutual mentor, Bumps Blackwell, to recording ‘Money Is’ & ‘Do It To It’ for the $ soundtrack, to doin’ the hang-thang at countless awards shows & industry events, every moment spent in Richard’s company was a thrill.”
  • “I just heard the news about Little Richard and I’m so grieved. He was my shining star and guiding light back when I was only a little boy. His was the original spirit that moved me to do everything I would do,” Bob Dylan tweeted. “…Of course he’ll live forever. But it’s like a part of your life is gone.”
  • “With his exuberance, his creativity, and his refusal to be anything other than himself, Little Richard laid the foundation for generations of artists to follow. We are so lucky to have had him. Sending all my love to his family and friends today,” Michelle Obama tweeted.
  • “Without a doubt—musically, vocally and visually—he was my biggest influence,” Elton John wrote on social media. “Seeing him live in my teens was the most exciting event in my life at that point. Goosebumps, electricity and joy came from every pore. His records still sound fresh and the opening few seconds of ‘Tutti Frutti’ are the most explosive in music history. … #RIP Little Richard.”
  • “I served soul food brunch to Little Richard every Sunday for a year while waitressing at Aunt Kizzy’s Back Porch in LA. I was a college student. He tipped me a crisp $100 bill each week on a $75 breakfast with friends. This was 30 years ago. Helped me so much. God rest his soul,” filmmaker Ava DuVernay tweeted.
  • “#LittleRichard was a genius, pure and simple. He paved the way for (code for he was ripped off by)so many artists. Watch his YouTube performances to see what I mean. I met him on Down and Out in Beverly Hills”, in which he was hilarious. What a legacy. God bless you, Richard,” Bette Midler tweeted.

May he rest in peace…..

Be Well….Be Safe…….

“lego ergo scribo”

Pussy Galore Is Dead!

I am a huge James Bond fan….and one of my favorite characters was in the book Goldfinger and her name was Pussy Galore.

The actress was best known for her role as Cathy Gale in the 1960s TV series The Avengers and as Pussy Galore in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger with Sean Connery as 007. Her family said in a statement to The Guardian: ‘It’s with great sadness that we have to announce the death of Honor Blackman aged 94. ‘She died peacefully of natural causes at her home in Lewes, Sussex, surrounded by her family. She was much loved and will be greatly missed by her two children Barnaby and Lottie, and grandchildren Daisy, Oscar, Olive and Toby.

‘As well as being a much-adored mother and grandmother, Honor was an actor of hugely prolific creative talent; with an extraordinary combination of beauty, brains and physical prowess, along with her unique voice and a dedicated work ethic, she achieved an unparalleled iconic status in the world of film and entertainment and with absolute commitment to her craft and total professionalism in all her endeavours she contributed to some of the great films and theatre productions of our times.’

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2020/04/06/avengers-star-bond-girl-honor-blackman-dies-aged-94-12517490/

She will be missed.

May she rest in peace…

“lego ergo scribo”

Know When To Fold Them

Sad news the lead singer in the 1960s group First Edition has passed away…you may know his as “The Gambler” or maybe better as Kenny Rogers.

Actor-singer Kenny Rogers, the Grammy-winning balladeer who spanned jazz, folk, country, and pop with hits like “Lucille,” “Lady,” and “Islands in the Stream” and embraced his persona as “The Gambler” died Friday night. He was 81. He died at home in Sandy Springs, Ga., his representative tells the AP, adding that Rogers was under hospice care and died of natural causes. The Houston-born performer with the husky voice and silver beard sold tens of millions of records, won three Grammys, and was the star of TV movies based on “The Gambler” and other songs, making him a superstar in the ’70s and ’80s. Rogers thrived for some 60 years before he retired from touring in 2017 at age 79. Despite his crossover success, he always preferred to be thought of as a country singer. Rogers was a five-time CMA Award winner and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2013.

A true rags-to-riches story, Rogers was raised in public housing in Houston Heights with seven siblings. His breakthrough came when he was asked to join the New Christy Minstrels folk group in 1966, which re-formed as the First Edition. After the group broke up in 1974, Rogers started his solo career and found a big hit with the sad country ballad “Lucille” in 1977, which crossed over to the pop charts and earned Rogers his first Grammy. Suddenly a star, Rogers added hit after hit for more than a decade. “The Gambler,” the Grammy-winning story song, came out in 1978 and became his signature song, spawning a hit TV movie of the same name and several sequels. Over the years, Rogers worked often with female duet partners, most memorably Dolly Parton, with whom he performed “Islands in the Stream.” Rogers’ family is planning a private service “out of concern for the national COVID-19 emergency,” per a statement. A public memorial will be held at a later date.

May he Rest In Peace……

Please enjoy Kenny from the past….

 

 

Please enjoy your day……be well and be safe….

“lego ergo scribo”

Saying Goodbye To Kirk

With all the theatrics in politics these days news like this seem to be pushed under the carpet…..

We have lost an American cinematic royal…..

A man who might have been the biggest male movie star since World War II died Wednesday. His name was Kirk Douglas. “It is with tremendous sadness that my brothers and I announce that Kirk Douglas left us today at the age of 103,” his son Michael Douglas wrote on Instagram, per the Hollywood Reporter. The actor known for his dimples and fierce gaze acted in a wide range of films, from The Bad and the Beautiful to Champion to Lust for Life and Paths of Glory. The three-time Oscar nominee (and recipient of an honorary Oscar in 1996) is also cherished in Hollywood for breaking the 1950s blacklist by crediting Dalton Trumbo for his screenplay on Spartacus, in which Douglas starred. He was also a political activist, family man, and charity benefactor, notes Variety.

His intense ambition was rooted in family. Born to Russian Jewish immigrants in Amsterdam, NY, Douglas was the poor son of a ragman. He rose up by putting himself through university, served in the Navy, and returned to civilian life to act on Broadway and, soon after, in Hollywood. A rebel with strong opinions—and a reputation for being difficult—he started his own film company and made his own films. He was married twice and had four sons, who all went into the movie business. A 1996 stroke nearly led him to suicide, but he fought on. And on the big screen, he’s always a giant: “To me, acting is creating an illusion, showing tremendous discipline, not losing yourself in the character that you’re portraying,” he once wrote, per the New York Times. “The actor never gets lost in the character he’s playing; the audience does.”

I have watched Kirk Douglas movies most of my life……my favorites were The Vikings, Seven Days In May…..but most of them were great……

What were your favorites?

May he rest in peace.

“lego ergo scribo”