Military Intelligence (Not The Oxymoron)

These days in the news and opinion blogs we see a lot about the CIA, NSA, etc…..has anyone asked…where did all this stuff begin?

Yep, another Professor’s Classroom…..

There have always been spies….those individuals that were employed to get info, vital info, on the enemy……but military intelligence came into its own during the years of World War One……

Near the beginning of the Revolutionary War, George Washington purportedly said, “The necessity of procuring good intelligence is apparent and need not be further urged.” Even in the 18th Century the importance of intelligence collection and analysis was understood. Today commanders often take for granted the fact that they will have robust intelligence assets and organizations to inform their decision making process, supporting them in ways Washington never could have envisioned. But as James L. Gilbert points out in his book, World War I and the Origins of U.S. Military Intelligence this was not always the case. George Washington who is often credited as the United States first great spymaster ran several spy rings during the revolutionary war including the famous Culper Ring.  The Culper Ring is credited, among other things with providing Washington early warning of British activity and helping identify a British spy working with Benedict Arnold. Washington’s intelligence collection abilities were so good that an unnamed British Intelligence Officer is often quoted as saying, ““Washington did not really outfight the British. He simply out-spied us.” It would take the U.S. Army almost 150 years to comply with George Washington’s urging and create a permanent Intelligence apparatus.

Source: World War I and the Origins of U.S. Military Intelligence | RealClearDefense

Now you know the “rest of the story”……..

Class dismissed!

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Military Intelligence (Not The Oxymoron)

  1. As I recall, there was some pretty good spying during the Civil War too. Both sides had supporters behind the lines, and a lot of women were used too. Of course, Elizabeth I had a great spy network, run by Walsingham, as long ago as the 16th century. I think I would have liked to have a been a spy. Not your run of the mill job, for sure.
    Best wishes, Pete.

  2. From what I understand, most spying is relatedly ho-hum–like the police stake-outs, investigative reporting, etc. no call for Bond’s dinner jackets, Asti]on Martins or hot babes. Enjoy!

  3. ” George Washington who is often credited as the United States first great spymaster ran several spy rings during the revolutionary war including the famous Culper Ring. The Culper Ring is credited, among other things with providing Washington early warning of British activity and helping identify a British spy working with Benedict Arnold.”

    As a regular Canuck viewer of Turn: Washington’s Spies on AMC (about to start it’s last season) I always find myself cheering AGAINST Washington’s band of terrorists & devious, disloyal, spies and FOR patriotic hero, Sir John Graves Simcoe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Graves_Simcoe

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s