Is Slavery A Dead Issue?

We are taught that the Emancipation Proclamation by Lincoln officially ended the institution of slavery in the United States……

For those not sure what the Proclamation was truly all about…..

On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which declared that as of January 1, 1863, all enslaved people in the states currently engaged in rebellion against the Union “shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

Lincoln didn’t actually free all of the approximately 4 million men, women and children held in slavery in the United States when he signed the formal Emancipation Proclamation the following January. The document applied only to enslaved people in the Confederacy, and not to those in the border states that remained loyal to the Union.

That is the short definition and an intro to the next thought in this post….

There are 5 states that will be voting on the slavery issue in 2022……

The 2022 elections have already shaped up to be among the most politically-charged midterm elections in some time. Among the many political races and laws that will be on the ballot in November, several states will be voting on a question that most of us had assumed had been settled long ago: rather to officially abolish slavery. Here’s what to know before voting in November.

Despite conservative attempts to whitewash history in recent years, those of us with even a cursory understanding of American history generally believe that slavery was abolished in the United States as a result of the Civil War. That is technically true. The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution declares that “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Over time, every state in the U.S. has ratified the 13th Amendment, although the last state to do so was Mississippi in 2013.  (Of course it was)

The “except as a punishment for crime” clause in the 13th amendment, however, allowed southern states to criminalize Blackness in ways that let them retain some degree of forced labor, and over time it has contributed to the problem of mass incarceration in the U.S. The exception clause found in the 13th Amendment is similar to language found in the laws of several states. Five of those states — Alabama, Louisiana, Oregon, Tennessee and Vermont — will vote in November on whether to remove those clauses from state law.

Instagram account @so.informed posted a series of graphics explaining the particular questions on the ballots of each of these five states. All five states’ referendums proposed removing slavery or indentured servitude clauses from their state’s constitutions. If passed, the Tennessee and Vermont proposals would additionally add language to those states’ constitutions specifically clarifying that slavery or other forms of involuntary servitude are forbidden under all circumstances. The Alabama proposal, however, would result in the state “removing all racist language” from its constitution.

https://blavity.com/five-states-to-vote-on-slavery-yes-slavery-in-november

So after over 100 years the institution and the wordings are not over…..the fight continues.

Be Smart!

Learn Stuff!

Then Vote!

I Read, I Write, You Know

“lego ergo scribo”

4 thoughts on “Is Slavery A Dead Issue?

  1. Here is the story ,, listen carefully and think deeply —In time to come, the radicalized U.S. Supreme Corkscrew will eventually get around to eradicating the 13th amendment altogether (Or will rewrite it) and while they are on a roll they will also do away with child labor laws and will refabricate almost every word, sentence, paragraph or phrase of the U.S. Constitution to make it possible for them to enslave the entire population to their fascist oligarchy that they are working so hard to replace our democracy with.

  2. The whole question of slavery is a big issue over here, chuq. There are people trying to claim money because their distant relatives were enslaved, and many protests about Britain’s slave trade. ( Which ended in 1834)
    Best wishes, Pete.

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