The Original Code Talkers

Time for the old professor to drop the history bomb!

Almost everyone knows the story of the Navajo Code Talkers during the Pacific campaign in World War Two……That Cage dude made the brave Native Americans a household term (for awhile)…..but no one knows that the Code Talkers in WW2 were not the first time Native Americans were used to confound the enemy.

The Choctaws were used in World War One in the same manner as the Navajo in WW2…….

One of the so-called “Five Civilized Tribes” of the southeastern United States, the Choctaw traditionally farmed corn, beans and pumpkins while also hunting, fishing and gathering wild edibles. Despite allying themselves with the United States in the War of 1812, they were pressured afterwards into ceding millions of acres of land to the government. Following the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830, most members of the tribe were then forced to relocate to present-day Oklahoma in a series of poorly planned and poorly provisioned journeys that left an estimated 2,500 dead. In what would become a catchphrase for all Indian removal west of the Mississippi River, a Choctaw chief described it as a “trail of tears.”

When the United States entered World War I in April 1917, it had not yet granted citizenship to all Native Americans, and government-run boarding schools were still largely attempting to stamp out their languages and cultures. Nonetheless, several thousand Native Americans enlisted in the armed forces to fight the Central Powers. Nearly 1,000 of them representing some 26 tribes joined the 36th Division alone, which consisted of men from Texas and Oklahoma. “They saw that they were needed to protect home and country,” said Judy Allen, senior executive officer of tribal relations for the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, “so they went to the nearest facility where they could sign up and were shipped out.”

https://www.history.com/news/world-war-is-native-american-code-talkers

http://www.texasmilitaryforcesmuseum.org/choctaw/codetalkers.htm

These men should be held in the same high regard as their Navajo cousins….but for the most part are pretty much forgotten in the sands of time and by an ungrateful nation.

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10 thoughts on “The Original Code Talkers

  1. When I was in the funeral industry back in AZ we buried one of the Code Talkers. Apparently the ones depicted in the movie was a “first group” of about a hundred.. after which there was another group of about 400. The one we buried was in the followup group. Doesn’t make his story or valor any less than the others.. just adds a historical demention to the entire code effort.

    1. True that…the Choctaw were afraid because in those days they could be punished for using their native tongue……fascinating….chuq

  2. Their contribution was immeasurable. They were usually with the USMC, so Dad, being in the Army Air Corps saw how the Nisei went behind enemy lines, cut the wires and gave false orders to the enemy – then they had to try and get back – without getting killed by their own fellow troops.

  3. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    NAVAJO CODE TALKERS … ‘No one knows that the Code Talkers in WW2 were not the first time Native Americans were used to confound the enemy. The Choctaws were used in World War One in the same manner as the Navajo in WW2. These men should be held in the same high regard as their Navajo cousins …. but for the most part are pretty much forgotten in the sands of time and by an ungrateful nation.’
    Ungrateful nation … is an American reality!!

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