The Dakota Uprising

This is for my American Civil War buffs….there were many battles that do not make the history books and this is just such a conflict…

The year is 1862 and the place is Minnesota.

Fort Snelling played a central role in the war and its aftermath. In early August 1862, recruitment of the Sixth through Eleventh Infantry regiments meant for service in the Civil War had commenced. When news of Dakota attacks reached St. Paul, Governor Ramsey appointed Henry Sibley a colonel in the state’s military forces and commander of the army that would march against the Dakota. Sibley led four hastily armed companies of the Sixth Infantry Regiment from Fort Snelling to St. Peter. Over the next few days, a trickle of supplies and detachments from the other partially recruited infantry regiments and militia units left Fort Snelling to join Sibley.

The state’s military forces came under federal control on September 16, when Major General John Pope assumed command of the newly created Military Department of the Northwest. Sibley, just appointed a brigadier general of US Army volunteers, directed the US forces in the decisive Battle of Wood Lake on September 23, defeating the Dakota. Many of the Dakota combatants moved westward into Dakota Territory, while others went north to Canada, but many of the men who had fought stayed with their families, who could not move swiftly enough to escape. Numerous Dakota who had not participated in the war, as well as some who had, met Sibley’s army at a place that came to be called Camp Release. When he arrived, Sibley took the Dakota into the custody of the US military.

https://www.mnhs.org/fortsnelling/learn/us-dakota-war

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4 thoughts on “The Dakota Uprising

  1. The tribes fought for both sides in the war, in limited numbers. But some also sought to take advantage of the conflict to regain territory. With little success, it would seem.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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