Can Afghanistan Be Saved?

The US went to Afghanistan after the cowardly attacks of 9/11 to get the mastermind of the attacks…..we failed originally but we stayed to save Afghanistan from the brutality of the Taleban…..to be honest…we are failing at that attempt as well.

There are peace talks these days between the government of Afghanistan and the Taleban and the US is playing a minor role (or so we are told)…..but all indications are that the US wants peace much more than the Afghans…..

I recently read that only a little over half of Americans are even aware the U.S. is, after 17 years, still fighting a war in Afghanistan. Since the beginning of the war, the U.S. has spent more than $900 billion dollars in military and civilian support. This does not include the human toll of those killed and the tens of thousands wounded.

Unfortunately, there is little to show for all this expense.

Yes, Afghanistan has an army, but without U.S. forces they would quickly succumb to the Taliban, who today control more than half of the country. On the civilian side, the Afghan government, despite proven reserves of valuable minerals including lithium and rare earth (estimates are over a trillion dollars worth) remains dependent upon a constant stream of donor dollars.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/04/27/afghanistan-trump-taliban-opium-corruption-column/3589562002/

Basically we Americans are trying to save Afghans from themselves….and in the long run (if that benchmark has not been met yet) do Afghans want to be “saved”?

After nearly two decades of bloodshed, meaningful progress is finally being made towards a conclusion of the war in Afghanistan. Negotiations with the Taliban in Qatar have achieved an uncommon consistency. On the domestic front, a bipartisan resolution matching the Taliban’s proposed timeline has emerged in the U.S. Senate. The main voices opposing peace originate from within the Pentagon and the Afghan National Unity Government. In a departure from their constitutionally mandated subordinate role, top generals are calling for yet another extension on murky grounds. Afghan president Ashraf Ghani has also urged against a timely withdraw, claiming that the government in Kabul lacks the strength required for independence. Whether by incompetence or corruption, neither contingent should have the credibility to dictate the plan for removing U.S. forces from Afghanistan.

The conditions Washington and Kabul point to as requirements for a withdraw cannot be met. The National Unity Government does not represent a plurality of the Afghan people, and with former warlords in its ranks, it will continue to lack the requisite legitimacy to govern. In spite of the nearly $900 billion dedicated to reconstruction and governance efforts since 2001, Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) suffer from infiltration, ineptitude, and high casualty rates. It is unclear how additional years, lives, and billions of dollars will guide Afghanistan toward a stable future. The peace talks in Doha represent gradual yet genuine progress, and they warrant all the support Washington can muster. Alternatives to this current opportunity for peace represent a continuation of the same failed strategies toward an even more shameful, inevitable departure.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/middle-east-watch/america-cannot-save-afghanistan-55142

If Afghanistan cannot be saved then why must the US continue to pour cash and blood into the country?

There is a question for your next president or supreme leader (the title may change by next election.

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4 thoughts on “Can Afghanistan Be Saved?

  1. I suppose it depends on what we think of as ‘saved’. If we mean the removal of the Taliban, and a return to a society of ‘western values’, then that is a lost cause, for sure.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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